Featured book for June


Tell me everything you don’t remember

The stroke that changed my life

by Christine Hyung-Oak Lee

“Christine Hyung-Oak Lee woke up with a headache on the morning of December 31, 2006. By that afternoon, she saw the world–quite literally–upside down. By New Year’s Day, she was unable to form a coherent sentence. And after hours in the ER, days in the hospital, and multiple questions and tests, her doctors informed her that she had had a stroke.

For months afterward, Lee outsourced her memories to a journal, taking diligent notes to compensate for the thoughts she could no longer hold on to. It is from these notes that she has constructed this frank and compelling memoir. …

Lee illuminates the connection between memory and identity in an honest, meditative, and truly funny manner, utterly devoid of self-pity. And as she recovers, she begins to realize that this unexpected and devastating event has provided a catalyst for coming to terms with her true self–and, in a way, has allowed her to become the person she’s always wanted to be.”

Medical Humanities/3rd floor Special Collections
WL 356 L477t 2017

Featured Special Collections book for October

answertotheriddle_oct2016

The Answer to the Riddle is Me

by David Stuart MacLean

What if you had to reconstruct your identity from scratch?

“On October 17, 2002, David MacLean ‘woke up’ on a train platform in India with no idea who he was or why he was there. No money. No passport. No identity.
Taken to a mental hospital by the police, MacLean then started to hallucinate so severely he had to be tied down. Soon he could remember song lyrics, but not his family, his friends, or the woman he was told he loved. All of these symptoms, it turned out, were the result of the commonly prescribed malarial medication he had been taking. Upon his return to the States, he struggled to piece together the fragments of his former life in a harrowing, absurd, and unforgettable journey back to himself. …”

Medical Humanities/3rd floor Special Collections
WM 173.7 M163a 2014

De Humani Corporis Fabrica on Display in Boulder, August 8-31

The Health Sciences Library’s copy of the second edition of Vesalius’ great anatomy book, De Humani Corporis Fabrica, will be on display at the University of Colorado Art Museum in Boulder from the 8th through the 31st of August. De Humani Corporis Fabrica, plus other items borrowed from collections at CU—including rare books from Norlin’s Special Collections and Archives and costumes from the Colorado Shakespeare Festival—is part of the museum’s exhibition celebrating the arrival of  First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, on loan from the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC.

Andreas Vesalius’  De Humani Corporis Fabrica, first published in 1543, marked the transition of the study of anatomy from medieval to modern. While not the first anatomical work based on direct observation, its scope and the quality of its illustrations and typography made it hugely influential. The best-known images in the Fabrica are the “muscle men” from book 2, a series of progressively dissected figures dramatically posed in a landscape. The second edition was published in 1555, nine years before Shakespeare’s birth. The Health Sciences Library’s copy is bound in a beautiful sixteenth-century alum-tawed pigskin binding with brass clasps.

The First Folio, the first collected edition of Shakespeare’s plays, was published in 1623, seven years after the playwright’s death. The Folger Shakespeare Library is sending selected copies of the First Folio on a national tour of American museums, libraries, and universities to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. Visitors to First Folio! will come face to face with the original 1623 book, displayed open to Hamlet’s speech in which he debates whether “to be or not to be.” The tour is organized and sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Cincinnati Museum Center and the American Library Association. By the end of 2016, First Folios will have been exhibited in all 50 states, Washington, DC, and Puerto Rico.

The CU Art Museum, is located in the Visual Art Center at CU Boulder (1085 18th Street, Boulder CO 80309) and is open Monday through Saturday  11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays until 7:00 p.m. There is no admission fee, but visitors to the First Folio exhibit are asked to sign up for timed tickets at http://www.colorado.edu/cuartmuseum/exhibitions/view-upcoming/first-folio-book-gave-us-shakespeare

Learn more about the months of programming celebrating the arrival of the First Folio at the website: http://www.colorado.edu/shakespeareatcu/

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While the Health Sciences Library’s copy of the second edition of Vesalius’ De Humani Corporis Fabrica is on display in Boulder, the first edition remains available for use in Aurora. Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or call 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

Featured Special Collections book for June

2016_Andy_May
Andy Warhol was a Hoarder

By Claudia Kalb

“Was Albert Einstein autistic? Did Marilyn Monroe have borderline personality disorder? Would George Gershwin be diagnosed with ADHD today? In this surprising and inventive look at the evolution of how we think about mental health, acclaimed journalist Claudia Kalb provides a glimpse into the lives of 12 celebrated historic icons through the lens of modern psychology.

From Abraham Lincoln’s depression to Princess Diana’s bulimia, Kalb investigates a broad range of maladies, using historical records and interviews with leading mental health experts, biographers, and other specialists. Her nuanced analysis provides a captivating window into the intricacies of the brain and human behavior. …”

Medical Humanities/3rd floor Special Collections
WZ 313 K142a 2016

Rare Book Profile: John Evelyn’s Fumifugium, or, The Inconveniencie of the Aer and Smoak of London Dissipated.

John Evelyn’s Fumifugium, or, The Inconveniencie of the Aer and Smoak of London Dissipated. (London: W. Godbid for Gabriel Bedel and Thomas Collins, 1661) is one of the first works ever written on the problem of air pollution.

John Evelyn (1620-1706) was an English country gentleman who wrote over 30 books on a wide variety of topics. He is best known for his diary, which was published a century after his death. He also wrote Sculptura, on engraving and etching, which introduced the process of mezzotint to England.  One of his major works, Sylva, or a Discourse of Forest-trees, and the Propagation of Timber, a work on forestry, timber, fruit trees, and cider making, was written for the Royal Society.

Educated in the Middle Temple, London and at Balliol College, Oxford, Evelyn left England in 1643 to avoid involvement in the English Civil War, and traveled in France and Italy. He returned to England in 1652, and published two Royalist pamphlets in 1659. After the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, he served on several commissions, including London street improvement, the Royal Mint, repair of old St. Paul’s, and a commission for sick and wounded mariners and prisoners of war in England’s Dutch Wars (1665-74).  He was a founding member of the Royal Society, and was appointed to its council by its first and second charters in 1662 and 1663.

Fumifugium is a slender pamphlet, dedicated to King Charles II. The first section discusses the nature of air and its effect on health and longevity. Evelyn then describes the smoke in London, especially industrial smoke from burning coal, and how it damaged people’s health, buildings, and even water. In the second section, he proposes solutions, including making fuel wood more available, and requiring the worst-polluting industries to relocate several miles outside the city. In the third section, he proposes improving the air by establishing gardens all over the city, with sweet-smelling blooming trees and shrubs as well as flower beds and even some food crops (but not cabbage, “whose rotten and perishing stalks have a very noisome and unhealthy smell”)

The Health Sciences Library’s copy of Fumifugium is the first edition. It was given to the library by Dr. James J. Waring, with his bookplate inside the front cover. It was once bound with other works in a larger volume, as evidenced by handwritten page numbers above the printed ones. It was rebound in brown calfskin with simple gilt tooling on the inner turndowns. A previous owner made corrections to the text by hand. A description typed from a bookseller’s catalog is affixed inside the back cover, as is an envelope containing a description of the book cut from a supplement to the journal Nature.

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

EvelynFumifugium tp

Rare Book Profile: Arthur Hill Hassall’s Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine.

Arthur Hill Hassall’s Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine (London: Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, 1857) brought the problem of food and drug adulteration in London to public attention and led to major public health reforms.

Arthur Hill Hassall (1817-1894) was an English physician, microscopist, chemist, and pioneer in public health and food safety. He made major contributions in botany and histology, conducted some of the earliest research in what would become the field of phytopathology and wrote the first English text on histology. His research and activism improved the safety of the English food and water supply, and he was a pioneer in the sanatorium treatment of tuberculosis in Europe.

The youngest son of a physician in Middlesex, Hassall left home in 1834 to study at the Dublin Medical School and apprentice with his uncle, Sir James Murray, and became interested in microscopy and botany. In 1845, he moved to London, where he established a medical practice and continued his botanical studies. His research resulted in books on freshwater algae (1845) and the quality of London’s water supply (1850).

Hassall then turned to the problem of food quality. In 1850, he tested several samples of coffee, demonstrating that, contrary to popular belief, it was possible to detect adulteration microscopically and chemically. Publication of these results in The Lancet led to his becoming the chief analyst of the Analytical Sanitary Commission. From 1851 through 1854, Hassall analyzed over 2500 samples of food and drink from various London vendors. Chemical tests identified alum in bread, iron, lead, and mercury compounds in cayenne pepper, and copper salts in bottled foods. Vendors of both adulterated and pure products were named in the resulting reports, which were published in The Lancet. In 1855, Hassall published revised and expanded versions of his reports in a book, Food and Its Adulterations, followed two years later by a new work, Adulterations Detected. His work raised public awareness of how common adulteration was, which led to the Food Adulteration Act of 1860. In 1874 Hassall became the founding president of the Society of Public Analysts, and gained fame giving expert testimony in support of further reforms and legislation.

In addition to his investigative work, Hassall maintained a private medical practice in London. He was also elected to the staff of the Royal Free Hospital in 1853, where he served for fifteen years. In 1866, flare-up of pulmonary tuberculosis, which he had contracted as a student in Dublin, interrupted his career for several months while he sought treatment in different places, finally ending up in Ventnor, on the Isle of Wight. A Ventnor, he devised an innovative design for sanatorium living quarters, and the following year organized fundraising and construction of the facility. The Royal National Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Chest opened in Ventnor in 1868. In 1877 Hassall retired from his position as Chief Physician of the hospital and moved his family to San Remo, Italy, where he continued to treat patients and write on climatic treatment of tuberculosis until his death.

The Health Sciences Library’s copy of Adulterations Detected is the first edition. It was rebound in gray linen ca. 1970 by the Head of Denison Library, Frank B. Rogers, with a gilt-tooled black leather label from the original binding on the spine, and a former owner’s armorial bookplate affixed inside the front cover.

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

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For Your Enjoyment: Color Our Collections

Normally, altering pages of the library’s rare treasures is discouraged, but six images from books in the Health Sciences Library’s Rare Materials Collection are now available for coloring. Many printed illustrations, especially those published before 1800, were intended to be hand-colored, and we invite you to do that. The images have been uploaded to the library’s Facebook page.

These images were selected as part of the Color Our Collections event, February 1-5, 2016, led by the New York Academy of Medicine. Libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions from all over the world have made public domain images from their collections available on social media using the hashtag #ColorOurCollections.

You are invited to browse, download, and color any images you like, and if you are so inclined, please share your creation on social media with the hashtag..

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Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.Epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

 

Featured Special Collections book for January

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Brain Maker

by David Perlmutter, MD

Rates of neurological disorders are skyrocketing – from ADHD and debilitating anxiety to depression and even dementia. But a medical revolution is under way that will forever change how we understand and treat not only behavioral and mood disorders but also chronic headaches, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, autism, Alzheimer’s, and many more conditions. Astonishing new research is revealing that the health of your brain is, to an extraordinary degree, dictated by the state of your microbiome – the vast population of organisms that live in your body and outnumber your cells ten to one.
In Brain Maker, Dr. Perlmutter shows you how to take advantage of this cutting-edge knowledge, explaining how your microbiome develops from birth and evolves based on life-style choices, how it can become “sick,” and how nurturing gut health with a few easy strategies can dramatically alter your brain’s destiny for the better, boosting your mental clarity and adding years to your life.

3rd floor Special Collections, Indigenous
INDIG WL 348 P4516br 2015

Special Collections Featured Book for April

stitches
STITCHES a memoir…
By David Small
“One day David Small awoke from a supposedly harmless operation to discover that he had been transformed into a virtual mute. A vocal cord removed, his throat slashed and stitched together like a bloody boot, the fourteen-year-old boy had not been told that he had cancer and was expected to die.

In Stitches, Small, the award-winning children’s illustrator and author, re-creates this terrifying event in a life story that might have been imagined by Kafka. As the images painfully tumble out, one by one, we gain a ringside seat at a gothic family drama where David – a highly anxious yet supremely talented child – all too often became the unwitting object of his parents’ buried frustration and rage.

Believing that they were trying to do their best, David’s parents did just the reverse. Edward Small, a Detroit physician, who vented his own anger by hitting a punching bag, was convinced that he could cure his young son’s respiratory problems with heavy doses of radiation, possibly causing David’s cancer. Elizabeth, David’s mother, tyrannically stingy and excessively scolding, ran the Small household under a cone of silence where emotions, especially her own, were hidden.

Depicting this coming-of-age story with dazzling, kaleidoscopic images that turn nightmare into fairy tale, Small tells us of his journey from sickly child to cancer patient, to the troubled teen whose risky decision to run away from home at sixteen – with nothing more than the dream of becoming an artist – will resonate as the ultimate survival statement. …”

Medical Humanities/3rd floor Special Collections
QZ 201 S635s 2009

Rare Book Profile: Dell’anatomia, a facsimile of Leonardo da Vinci’s notebook.

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Dell’anatomia by Leonardo da Vinci (Rome: TREC edizioni pregiate, 2005) is a compilation of anatomical studies that predate the great anatomy books of the sixteenth century.

In January 2015, the Health Sciences Library Rare Materials Collection acquired a facsimile of the anatomical drawings and notes of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), composed between 1485 and 1515, which are now housed in the Royal Library, Windsor.

Leonardo’s early training in the studio of the painter Verrocchio in Florence included study of the human figure. When he became court artist to Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan in the 1480s, he began work on drawings of human anatomy, but in the 1490s he turned his attention to other projects. As his stature as an artist, and inventor grew, so did his access to human corpses. In the early 1500s, he resumed intensive study of anatomy based on human dissection. His drawings were remarkably accurate, even by modern standards. Some of his observations, such as those on the function of the heart, were not recorded again until the 20th century. Had his work been published, as he seems to have intended, it would have been revolutionary.

At Leonardo’s death in 1519, his manuscripts and drawings were bequeathed to his student and secretary, Francesco Melzi. After Melzi died in 1579, the documents were dispersed, eventually making their way into various collections, where Leonardo’s scientific works remained unpublished until centuries after his death.

This edition, published in 2005, is based on earlier editions of 1898 and 1901. 1,999 copies were produced. The facsimile, containing 113 color plates with line drawing overlays and 380 pages of text, was printed on a special paper made in Verona, and hand-bound in gold-tooled leather. It was purchased with funds from the Charley Smyth Library Endowment, established with the Library by the Anschutz Medical Campus Retired Faculty Association, in memory of their colleague and friend Dr. Charley Smyth, founder and Head of the Division of Rheumatology in the Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

 

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Special Collections featured book for August

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Bitter Medicine: a graphic memoir of mental illness, by Clem and Olivier Martini

“In 1976, Ben Martini was diagnosed with schizophrenia. A decade later, his brother Olivier was told he had the same disease. For the past thirty years the Martini family has struggled to comprehend and cope with a devastating illness, frustrated by a health care system lacking in resources and empathy, the imperfect science of medication, and the strain of mental illness on familial relationships. …”

3rd floor Special Collections, Humanities
HUM WM 203 M386b 2010

Special Collections Featured Book for March

Healers_and_Hellraisers_Mar2014

HEALERS AND HELLRAISERS

Denver Health’s First 150 years by Eileen Welsome
“In 1860, when Denver’s dirt streets were lined with saloons and shanties, two officials decided to settle their political differences through a duel. When the roar of the shotguns subsided, one duelist was still standing and the other lay writhing on the ground. The man was eventually taken to a frontier hospital where two doctors bound up his wounds and did everything they could to heal him. Medicine was still more art than science back then and the man died.
The frontier hospital was a precursor to Denver Health, which has survived and treated countless gunshot victims, as well as patients afflicted with other serious wounds and illnesses. Located just west of Speer Boulevard, between Sixth and Eighth avenues, the hospital is one of the city’s oldest institutions and one of its greatest resources. … “
“In these pages, you will read about the hospital’s rough-and-tumble beginnings, its near-death in the 1950s, and its rebirth at the dawn of the twenty-first century. …”

3rd floor Special Collections – History of Medicine OVERSIZE – WAR WX 28 AC6 D4 D416W 2011

Special Collection Featured Book for January

Revolutionary Medicine: the Founding Fathers and Mothers in Sickness and in Health
Revolutionary medicine
by Jeanne E. Abrams

“Before the advent of modern antibiotics, one’s life could be abruptly shattered by contagion and death, and debility from infectious diseases and epidemics was commonplace for early Americans, regardless of social status. Concerns over health affected the founding fathers and their families as it did slaves, merchants, immigrants, and everyone else in North America. As both victims of illness and national leaders, the Founders occupied a unique position regarding the development of public health in America. Revolutionary Medicine refocuses the study of the lives of George and Martha Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John and Abigail Adams, and James and Dolley Madison away from the usual lens of politics to the unique perspective of sickness, health, and medicine in their era.

For the founders, republican ideals fostered a reciprocal connection between individual health and the “health” of the nation. Studying the encounters of these American founders with illness and disease, as well as their viewpoints about good health, not only provides us with a richer and more nuanced insight into their lives, but also opens a window into the practice of medicine in the eighteenth century, which is at once intimate, personal, and first hand. …”

Medical Humanities / Special Collections 3rd floor
WZ 313 A1614r 2013

Featured New Book – “Always There”

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“Always There:
the remarkable life of Ruth Lillian Kirschstein, M.D.”
by Alison F. Davis, Ph.D.

“There are very few people who have such a profound impact on their professions that the telling of their life story is also a recounting of the history of their time and place. Ruth L. Kirschstein, M.D., who provided direction and leadership to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through much of the second half of the 20th century, was one such person. At a moment in time when professional service to the government is often not given the respect it deserves, the story of Ruth’s life, and the positive effect she had on public policy, public health, and the training of several generations of biomedical researchers, should inspire those considering public service and give great satisfaction to those currently serving the nation and the world.”

History of Medicine Collection /3rd Floor
WAR WZ 100 K605d 2011

Rare Book Profile: Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent’s A Choice Manual, or, Rare and Select Secrets in Physick and Chirurgery.

Elizabeth Grey’s A Choice Manual, or, Rare and Select Secrets in Physick and Chirurgery (London: Gartrude Dawson, 1659) is a collection of household recipes, published with her A True Gentlewomans Delight, Wherein is Contained all Manner of Cookery. The collections were edited with additions by W. Jar,” a professor of physick.” While A Choice Manual and A True Gentlewoman’s Delight have separate title pages and pagination, and are sometimes bound separately, they were printed and sold as a single work. The first part is mainly medicinal, while the second is entirely culinary, although some of the ingredients in the medicinal recipes now seem more like food than medicine.
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Elizabeth Talbot Grey (1581-1651) was the eldest daughter of Gilbert Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, and a granddaughter of Bess of Hardwick. She married Henry Grey, Earl of Kent in 1601. She was well educated, a patron of scholars and poets, and the employer of Robert May, famous for his book The Accomplisht Cook (1660). She was known for her medical knowledge. Her sister, Alethea Howard, Countess of Arundel, shared her interests, and published her own recipe collection, Natura Exenterata. A True Gentlewomans Delight includes a recipe for Lady of Arundels Manchet (white bread).

The first edition of the Countess’s compilation was printed in 1653 by Gartrude Dawson, who took over her husband’s London print shop after his death. Instead of addressing a nobleman, the dedication of A Choice Manual is to “the virtuous and most noble Lady, Latitia Popham,” the wife of a supporter of Oliver Cromwell, and A True Gentlewomans Delight is dedicated to Mistress Anne Pile, a baronet’s daughter. The book was a bestseller, with many updated editions. The 22nd and last edition was published in 1726.

The Health Sciences Library’s copy is the 11th edition, published 1659. The title page of the first section and the last 4 pages of the second have been damaged, with a slight loss of text, and the book lacks the Countess’ portrait. It came to the library as a gift from the Denver Medical Society, and was rebound in brown leather by Frank B. Rogers.

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]