CDC launches new FREE eLearning course addressing health literacy, limited English proficiency, and cultural differences

9 out of 10 adults struggle to understand and use health information when it’s unfamiliar, complex or jargon-filled. Limited health literacy costs the healthcare system money and results in higher than necessary morbidity and mortality.

Health care professionals and non-medical staff can register for Effective Communication for Healthcare Teams: Addressing Health Literacy, Limited English Proficiency and Cultural Differences. The lessons and practice activities in this course help healthcare professionals assess their patients’ health literacy and language needs and practice culturally competent care.

Continuing education provided for

  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • Certified Health Education Specialists
  • Pharmacists
  • Certified Public Health Professionals

Register for this FREE Course today by setting up your CDC TRAIN profile and launching the course at https://www.train.org/main/training_plan/3985.

If you have questions please contact healthliteracy@cdc.gov

Rare Book Profile: Arthur Hill Hassall’s Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine.

Arthur Hill Hassall’s Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine (London: Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, 1857) brought the problem of food and drug adulteration in London to public attention and led to major public health reforms.

Arthur Hill Hassall (1817-1894) was an English physician, microscopist, chemist, and pioneer in public health and food safety. He made major contributions in botany and histology, conducted some of the earliest research in what would become the field of phytopathology and wrote the first English text on histology. His research and activism improved the safety of the English food and water supply, and he was a pioneer in the sanatorium treatment of tuberculosis in Europe.

The youngest son of a physician in Middlesex, Hassall left home in 1834 to study at the Dublin Medical School and apprentice with his uncle, Sir James Murray, and became interested in microscopy and botany. In 1845, he moved to London, where he established a medical practice and continued his botanical studies. His research resulted in books on freshwater algae (1845) and the quality of London’s water supply (1850).

Hassall then turned to the problem of food quality. In 1850, he tested several samples of coffee, demonstrating that, contrary to popular belief, it was possible to detect adulteration microscopically and chemically. Publication of these results in The Lancet led to his becoming the chief analyst of the Analytical Sanitary Commission. From 1851 through 1854, Hassall analyzed over 2500 samples of food and drink from various London vendors. Chemical tests identified alum in bread, iron, lead, and mercury compounds in cayenne pepper, and copper salts in bottled foods. Vendors of both adulterated and pure products were named in the resulting reports, which were published in The Lancet. In 1855, Hassall published revised and expanded versions of his reports in a book, Food and Its Adulterations, followed two years later by a new work, Adulterations Detected. His work raised public awareness of how common adulteration was, which led to the Food Adulteration Act of 1860. In 1874 Hassall became the founding president of the Society of Public Analysts, and gained fame giving expert testimony in support of further reforms and legislation.

In addition to his investigative work, Hassall maintained a private medical practice in London. He was also elected to the staff of the Royal Free Hospital in 1853, where he served for fifteen years. In 1866, flare-up of pulmonary tuberculosis, which he had contracted as a student in Dublin, interrupted his career for several months while he sought treatment in different places, finally ending up in Ventnor, on the Isle of Wight. A Ventnor, he devised an innovative design for sanatorium living quarters, and the following year organized fundraising and construction of the facility. The Royal National Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Chest opened in Ventnor in 1868. In 1877 Hassall retired from his position as Chief Physician of the hospital and moved his family to San Remo, Italy, where he continued to treat patients and write on climatic treatment of tuberculosis until his death.

The Health Sciences Library’s copy of Adulterations Detected is the first edition. It was rebound in gray linen ca. 1970 by the Head of Denison Library, Frank B. Rogers, with a gilt-tooled black leather label from the original binding on the spine, and a former owner’s armorial bookplate affixed inside the front cover.

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

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HSL Hosts Public Health Case Competition

CSPH_Case_Compete

November 7th & 8th, the library hosted the second annual Rocky Mountain Region Public Health Case competition. The event began Friday afternoon, when the students were given a case study about marijuana exposure in minors after legalization in the state of Colorado and were tasked with coming up with a public health intervention to address accidental exposure in children or intentional use in teens. The students created proposals for a theoretical 3-year, $3 million dollar grant and  gave 10 minute presentation to a panel of judges. All of this research and planning was conducted in a 24 hour period! To facilitate this work, librarians were “on call” Friday afternoon and evening to help the students with their research. The first round of presentations occurred on Sunday November 9th, and the top 4 presentations were selected to go to the finals on Monday November 10th. Read more about what the finalists came up with on the university news site.

http://www.ucdenver.edu/about/newsroom/spotlight/students/Pages/Amping-up-awareness-of-dangers-of-marijuana.aspx?source=todayAMC

New Resource: Global Health (CABI)

Cab direct

We have a new database for global and public health: Global Health through CABI.

About: Global Health focuses on public health research and practice. Topics include:

  • Biomedical life sciences
  • Chronic diseases
  • Diagnosis and therapy of disease
  • Environmental and occupational health
  • Epidemiology and biostatistics
  • Health promotion
  • Health systems
  • Infectious diseases and parasitology
  • Nutrition and food sciences
  • Public Health
  • Public Health Emergencies
  • Tropical and international health.

Global Health Archive offers over 800,000 records on public health from out-of-print journals dating back to 1910.

Look for Global Health on the library’s databases page.