New Books List

3rd floor Special Collections
Stauss-Wisneski Indigenous and Integrative Medicine Collection

Australian native plants : cultivation and uses in the health and food industries
Comprehensive compendium of supraclavicular disorders in Ayurveda = Sampūrṇa saṅkalita śālākyatantra vijñāna
Ethno-medicine for traditional health care
Highly traded medicinal and aromatic plants of North East India
Medicinal plants policy and regulations for India : within the framework of participatory forest management
Mosby’s complementary & alternative medicine : a research-based approach
NFI : National formulary of India
Secrets of aboriginal healing : a physicist’s journey with a remote Australian tribe
Surviving when modern medicine fails : a definitive guide to essential oils that could save your life during a crisis
Tanaina plantlore, Dena’ina k’et’una : an ethnobotany of the Dena’ina Indians of southcentral Alaska
A Thai herbal : traditional recipes for health and harmony
Traditional Medicine and Globalization : the Future of Ancient Systems of Medicine

Stacks

Biochemistry
Clinical nursing skills & techniquesEmery’s elements of medical genetics
Handbook of clinical psychopharmacology for therapists
Kaplan & Sadock’s concise textbook of clinical psychiatry
Marino’s the ICU book
Nursing diagnosis handbook : an evidence-based guide to planning care

New Books List

3rd floor Special Collections
Medical Humanities

Autobiography of a face
All the light we cannot see : a novel
Death be not proud : a memoir
Doctor Zhivago
The hysterectomy waltz
I shall not hate : a Gaza doctor’s journey on the road to peace and human dignity
Illness : the cry of the flesh
A journey round my skull
Journey to the end of the night
The end of your life book club
Everywhere antennas
Girl in the dark : a novel
Keeper : one house, three generations, and a journey into Alzheimer’s
The little locksmith : a memoir
The magic mountain
The making of Mr. Gray’s anatomy
The medicalization of society: on the transformation of human conditions into treatable disorders
Of love and other demons
Pathologies of the West : an anthropology of mental illness in Europe and America
Pieces of light : how the new science of memory illuminates the stories we tell about our pasts
Rat girl
The royal physician’s visit
Scar tissue
Secrets of women : gender, generation, and the origins of human dissection
Unbearable lightness : a story of loss and gain
Unnatural history : breast cancer and American society
Voluntary madness : my year lost and found in the loony bin
What to read on love, not sex : Freud, fiction, and the articulation of truth in modern psychological science
Wit : a play

Search the World with Interlibrary Loan!

Eye_ILL_blogWhether you’re faculty, staff, or a student on the Anschutz Medical Campus, you’re going to find yourself doing a lot of research. And while the library has access to thousands of journals and books, it certainly doesn’t have everything that you may require. But don’t let that limit you! The Interlibrary Loan (ILL) Department can help you obtain the materials that you need!

If you’re an affiliated member of the AMC, the services provided by Interlibrary Loan (ILL) are free! Simply sign up for an ILLiad account and begin placing requests immediately for articles, books, theses, and other research materials. While ILL isn’t a guarantee, we will do what we can to fill your requests.

If you have any questions about the ILL service provided to faculty, staff, and students, or your eligibility, please do not hesitate to contact the ILL office at 303-724-2111 or at copydocs@ucdenver.edu.

[Brittany Heer, Interlibrary Loan Manager]

De Humani Corporis Fabrica on Display in Boulder, August 8-31

The Health Sciences Library’s copy of the second edition of Vesalius’ great anatomy book, De Humani Corporis Fabrica, will be on display at the University of Colorado Art Museum in Boulder from the 8th through the 31st of August. De Humani Corporis Fabrica, plus other items borrowed from collections at CU—including rare books from Norlin’s Special Collections and Archives and costumes from the Colorado Shakespeare Festival—is part of the museum’s exhibition celebrating the arrival of  First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, on loan from the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC.

Andreas Vesalius’  De Humani Corporis Fabrica, first published in 1543, marked the transition of the study of anatomy from medieval to modern. While not the first anatomical work based on direct observation, its scope and the quality of its illustrations and typography made it hugely influential. The best-known images in the Fabrica are the “muscle men” from book 2, a series of progressively dissected figures dramatically posed in a landscape. The second edition was published in 1555, nine years before Shakespeare’s birth. The Health Sciences Library’s copy is bound in a beautiful sixteenth-century alum-tawed pigskin binding with brass clasps.

The First Folio, the first collected edition of Shakespeare’s plays, was published in 1623, seven years after the playwright’s death. The Folger Shakespeare Library is sending selected copies of the First Folio on a national tour of American museums, libraries, and universities to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. Visitors to First Folio! will come face to face with the original 1623 book, displayed open to Hamlet’s speech in which he debates whether “to be or not to be.” The tour is organized and sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Cincinnati Museum Center and the American Library Association. By the end of 2016, First Folios will have been exhibited in all 50 states, Washington, DC, and Puerto Rico.

The CU Art Museum, is located in the Visual Art Center at CU Boulder (1085 18th Street, Boulder CO 80309) and is open Monday through Saturday  11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays until 7:00 p.m. There is no admission fee, but visitors to the First Folio exhibit are asked to sign up for timed tickets at http://www.colorado.edu/cuartmuseum/exhibitions/view-upcoming/first-folio-book-gave-us-shakespeare

Learn more about the months of programming celebrating the arrival of the First Folio at the website: http://www.colorado.edu/shakespeareatcu/

Vesalius_De_humani_corporis_fabrica_Port

While the Health Sciences Library’s copy of the second edition of Vesalius’ De Humani Corporis Fabrica is on display in Boulder, the first edition remains available for use in Aurora. Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or call 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

Featured Special Collections book for June

2016_Andy_May
Andy Warhol was a Hoarder

By Claudia Kalb

“Was Albert Einstein autistic? Did Marilyn Monroe have borderline personality disorder? Would George Gershwin be diagnosed with ADHD today? In this surprising and inventive look at the evolution of how we think about mental health, acclaimed journalist Claudia Kalb provides a glimpse into the lives of 12 celebrated historic icons through the lens of modern psychology.

From Abraham Lincoln’s depression to Princess Diana’s bulimia, Kalb investigates a broad range of maladies, using historical records and interviews with leading mental health experts, biographers, and other specialists. Her nuanced analysis provides a captivating window into the intricacies of the brain and human behavior. …”

Medical Humanities/3rd floor Special Collections
WZ 313 K142a 2016

Rare Book Profile: Arthur Hill Hassall’s Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine.

Arthur Hill Hassall’s Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine (London: Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, 1857) brought the problem of food and drug adulteration in London to public attention and led to major public health reforms.

Arthur Hill Hassall (1817-1894) was an English physician, microscopist, chemist, and pioneer in public health and food safety. He made major contributions in botany and histology, conducted some of the earliest research in what would become the field of phytopathology and wrote the first English text on histology. His research and activism improved the safety of the English food and water supply, and he was a pioneer in the sanatorium treatment of tuberculosis in Europe.

The youngest son of a physician in Middlesex, Hassall left home in 1834 to study at the Dublin Medical School and apprentice with his uncle, Sir James Murray, and became interested in microscopy and botany. In 1845, he moved to London, where he established a medical practice and continued his botanical studies. His research resulted in books on freshwater algae (1845) and the quality of London’s water supply (1850).

Hassall then turned to the problem of food quality. In 1850, he tested several samples of coffee, demonstrating that, contrary to popular belief, it was possible to detect adulteration microscopically and chemically. Publication of these results in The Lancet led to his becoming the chief analyst of the Analytical Sanitary Commission. From 1851 through 1854, Hassall analyzed over 2500 samples of food and drink from various London vendors. Chemical tests identified alum in bread, iron, lead, and mercury compounds in cayenne pepper, and copper salts in bottled foods. Vendors of both adulterated and pure products were named in the resulting reports, which were published in The Lancet. In 1855, Hassall published revised and expanded versions of his reports in a book, Food and Its Adulterations, followed two years later by a new work, Adulterations Detected. His work raised public awareness of how common adulteration was, which led to the Food Adulteration Act of 1860. In 1874 Hassall became the founding president of the Society of Public Analysts, and gained fame giving expert testimony in support of further reforms and legislation.

In addition to his investigative work, Hassall maintained a private medical practice in London. He was also elected to the staff of the Royal Free Hospital in 1853, where he served for fifteen years. In 1866, flare-up of pulmonary tuberculosis, which he had contracted as a student in Dublin, interrupted his career for several months while he sought treatment in different places, finally ending up in Ventnor, on the Isle of Wight. A Ventnor, he devised an innovative design for sanatorium living quarters, and the following year organized fundraising and construction of the facility. The Royal National Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Chest opened in Ventnor in 1868. In 1877 Hassall retired from his position as Chief Physician of the hospital and moved his family to San Remo, Italy, where he continued to treat patients and write on climatic treatment of tuberculosis until his death.

The Health Sciences Library’s copy of Adulterations Detected is the first edition. It was rebound in gray linen ca. 1970 by the Head of Denison Library, Frank B. Rogers, with a gilt-tooled black leather label from the original binding on the spine, and a former owner’s armorial bookplate affixed inside the front cover.

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

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