Connect Your Laptop Workstations

Working on something big? The Health Sciences Library is thrilled to offer full-size screens, keyboards, and mice at our brand new “Connect Your Laptop Workstations.” Connect your laptop using the cables provided and you’ll have a full 27” monitor to display your work in parallel or as an extended screen. Plus, whether you’re working with a brand new laptop or an older model, the HSL has a wide variety of adapters for checkout at the service desk to connect you to the workstations.

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Here’s how it works. The four Connect Your Laptop Workstations are located in the fourth pod of the north computer commons, next to the north printer station. Note the yellow placards on the table partitions. The four cables at the station are: USB3, connecting the keyboard and mouse to your laptop; VGA, connecting the monitor to an older laptop; HDMI, connecting high-definition video on newer laptops; and Mini Display Port, connecting video for a wide range of Apple products.

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Working with a brand new laptop and only have USB-C connections? Just check out an OMARS multi-port adapter from the service desk! This will allow you to use HDMI video, USB for keyboard/mouse, and still leave ports open for charging and connecting other devices.

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If you have any problems or need help getting started with a Connect Your Laptop Workstation, don’t hesitate to ask for assistance at the service desk during public access hours. If you have suggestions for this space or ideas on what technologies would be useful to you, let us know with a Tell Us comment!

Search the World with Interlibrary Loan!

Eye_ILL_blogWhether you’re faculty, staff, or a student on the Anschutz Medical Campus, you’re going to find yourself doing a lot of research. And while the library has access to thousands of journals and books, it certainly doesn’t have everything that you may require. But don’t let that limit you! The Interlibrary Loan (ILL) Department can help you obtain the materials that you need!

If you’re an affiliated member of the AMC, the services provided by Interlibrary Loan (ILL) are free! Simply sign up for an ILLiad account and begin placing requests immediately for articles, books, theses, and other research materials. While ILL isn’t a guarantee, we will do what we can to fill your requests.

If you have any questions about the ILL service provided to faculty, staff, and students, or your eligibility, please do not hesitate to contact the ILL office at 303-724-2111 or at copydocs@ucdenver.edu.

[Brittany Heer, Interlibrary Loan Manager]

Featured book for June


Tell me everything you don’t remember

The stroke that changed my life

by Christine Hyung-Oak Lee

“Christine Hyung-Oak Lee woke up with a headache on the morning of December 31, 2006. By that afternoon, she saw the world–quite literally–upside down. By New Year’s Day, she was unable to form a coherent sentence. And after hours in the ER, days in the hospital, and multiple questions and tests, her doctors informed her that she had had a stroke.

For months afterward, Lee outsourced her memories to a journal, taking diligent notes to compensate for the thoughts she could no longer hold on to. It is from these notes that she has constructed this frank and compelling memoir. …

Lee illuminates the connection between memory and identity in an honest, meditative, and truly funny manner, utterly devoid of self-pity. And as she recovers, she begins to realize that this unexpected and devastating event has provided a catalyst for coming to terms with her true self–and, in a way, has allowed her to become the person she’s always wanted to be.”

Medical Humanities/3rd floor Special Collections
WL 356 L477t 2017

De Humani Corporis Fabrica on Display in Boulder, August 8-31

The Health Sciences Library’s copy of the second edition of Vesalius’ great anatomy book, De Humani Corporis Fabrica, will be on display at the University of Colorado Art Museum in Boulder from the 8th through the 31st of August. De Humani Corporis Fabrica, plus other items borrowed from collections at CU—including rare books from Norlin’s Special Collections and Archives and costumes from the Colorado Shakespeare Festival—is part of the museum’s exhibition celebrating the arrival of  First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare, on loan from the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC.

Andreas Vesalius’  De Humani Corporis Fabrica, first published in 1543, marked the transition of the study of anatomy from medieval to modern. While not the first anatomical work based on direct observation, its scope and the quality of its illustrations and typography made it hugely influential. The best-known images in the Fabrica are the “muscle men” from book 2, a series of progressively dissected figures dramatically posed in a landscape. The second edition was published in 1555, nine years before Shakespeare’s birth. The Health Sciences Library’s copy is bound in a beautiful sixteenth-century alum-tawed pigskin binding with brass clasps.

The First Folio, the first collected edition of Shakespeare’s plays, was published in 1623, seven years after the playwright’s death. The Folger Shakespeare Library is sending selected copies of the First Folio on a national tour of American museums, libraries, and universities to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death. Visitors to First Folio! will come face to face with the original 1623 book, displayed open to Hamlet’s speech in which he debates whether “to be or not to be.” The tour is organized and sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Cincinnati Museum Center and the American Library Association. By the end of 2016, First Folios will have been exhibited in all 50 states, Washington, DC, and Puerto Rico.

The CU Art Museum, is located in the Visual Art Center at CU Boulder (1085 18th Street, Boulder CO 80309) and is open Monday through Saturday  11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays until 7:00 p.m. There is no admission fee, but visitors to the First Folio exhibit are asked to sign up for timed tickets at http://www.colorado.edu/cuartmuseum/exhibitions/view-upcoming/first-folio-book-gave-us-shakespeare

Learn more about the months of programming celebrating the arrival of the First Folio at the website: http://www.colorado.edu/shakespeareatcu/

Vesalius_De_humani_corporis_fabrica_Port

While the Health Sciences Library’s copy of the second edition of Vesalius’ De Humani Corporis Fabrica is on display in Boulder, the first edition remains available for use in Aurora. Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or call 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

Featured Special Collections book for June

2016_Andy_May
Andy Warhol was a Hoarder

By Claudia Kalb

“Was Albert Einstein autistic? Did Marilyn Monroe have borderline personality disorder? Would George Gershwin be diagnosed with ADHD today? In this surprising and inventive look at the evolution of how we think about mental health, acclaimed journalist Claudia Kalb provides a glimpse into the lives of 12 celebrated historic icons through the lens of modern psychology.

From Abraham Lincoln’s depression to Princess Diana’s bulimia, Kalb investigates a broad range of maladies, using historical records and interviews with leading mental health experts, biographers, and other specialists. Her nuanced analysis provides a captivating window into the intricacies of the brain and human behavior. …”

Medical Humanities/3rd floor Special Collections
WZ 313 K142a 2016

Rare Book Profile: Arthur Hill Hassall’s Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine.

Arthur Hill Hassall’s Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine (London: Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, 1857) brought the problem of food and drug adulteration in London to public attention and led to major public health reforms.

Arthur Hill Hassall (1817-1894) was an English physician, microscopist, chemist, and pioneer in public health and food safety. He made major contributions in botany and histology, conducted some of the earliest research in what would become the field of phytopathology and wrote the first English text on histology. His research and activism improved the safety of the English food and water supply, and he was a pioneer in the sanatorium treatment of tuberculosis in Europe.

The youngest son of a physician in Middlesex, Hassall left home in 1834 to study at the Dublin Medical School and apprentice with his uncle, Sir James Murray, and became interested in microscopy and botany. In 1845, he moved to London, where he established a medical practice and continued his botanical studies. His research resulted in books on freshwater algae (1845) and the quality of London’s water supply (1850).

Hassall then turned to the problem of food quality. In 1850, he tested several samples of coffee, demonstrating that, contrary to popular belief, it was possible to detect adulteration microscopically and chemically. Publication of these results in The Lancet led to his becoming the chief analyst of the Analytical Sanitary Commission. From 1851 through 1854, Hassall analyzed over 2500 samples of food and drink from various London vendors. Chemical tests identified alum in bread, iron, lead, and mercury compounds in cayenne pepper, and copper salts in bottled foods. Vendors of both adulterated and pure products were named in the resulting reports, which were published in The Lancet. In 1855, Hassall published revised and expanded versions of his reports in a book, Food and Its Adulterations, followed two years later by a new work, Adulterations Detected. His work raised public awareness of how common adulteration was, which led to the Food Adulteration Act of 1860. In 1874 Hassall became the founding president of the Society of Public Analysts, and gained fame giving expert testimony in support of further reforms and legislation.

In addition to his investigative work, Hassall maintained a private medical practice in London. He was also elected to the staff of the Royal Free Hospital in 1853, where he served for fifteen years. In 1866, flare-up of pulmonary tuberculosis, which he had contracted as a student in Dublin, interrupted his career for several months while he sought treatment in different places, finally ending up in Ventnor, on the Isle of Wight. A Ventnor, he devised an innovative design for sanatorium living quarters, and the following year organized fundraising and construction of the facility. The Royal National Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Chest opened in Ventnor in 1868. In 1877 Hassall retired from his position as Chief Physician of the hospital and moved his family to San Remo, Italy, where he continued to treat patients and write on climatic treatment of tuberculosis until his death.

The Health Sciences Library’s copy of Adulterations Detected is the first edition. It was rebound in gray linen ca. 1970 by the Head of Denison Library, Frank B. Rogers, with a gilt-tooled black leather label from the original binding on the spine, and a former owner’s armorial bookplate affixed inside the front cover.

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

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For Your Enjoyment: Color Our Collections

Normally, altering pages of the library’s rare treasures is discouraged, but six images from books in the Health Sciences Library’s Rare Materials Collection are now available for coloring. Many printed illustrations, especially those published before 1800, were intended to be hand-colored, and we invite you to do that. The images have been uploaded to the library’s Facebook page.

These images were selected as part of the Color Our Collections event, February 1-5, 2016, led by the New York Academy of Medicine. Libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions from all over the world have made public domain images from their collections available on social media using the hashtag #ColorOurCollections.

You are invited to browse, download, and color any images you like, and if you are so inclined, please share your creation on social media with the hashtag..

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Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.Epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

 

Special Collections featured book for August

2014_Bitter_Medicine_Aug

Bitter Medicine: a graphic memoir of mental illness, by Clem and Olivier Martini

“In 1976, Ben Martini was diagnosed with schizophrenia. A decade later, his brother Olivier was told he had the same disease. For the past thirty years the Martini family has struggled to comprehend and cope with a devastating illness, frustrated by a health care system lacking in resources and empathy, the imperfect science of medication, and the strain of mental illness on familial relationships. …”

3rd floor Special Collections, Humanities
HUM WM 203 M386b 2010

More New Items in the Digital Collections of Colorado

More NEW items in the DCC!! Documents, Presentations, Theses and Dissertations

CU Anschutz Medical Campus Publications:
Faculty – presentations

Graduate School:
Spring 2014 – Theses and Dissertations

Health Sciences Library:
Denison Memorial Library newsletter – Connections

Health Sciences Library newsletter – Appendix

http://digitool.library.colostate.edu/R/3CH5CLPUGBGNE6RMIJX1EUE7I8SUHUP1625R9RBJAUYU8MQIPS-00081?func=collections&collection_id=2381&local_base=GEN01-UCH

Special Collections Featured Book for March

Healers_and_Hellraisers_Mar2014

HEALERS AND HELLRAISERS

Denver Health’s First 150 years by Eileen Welsome
“In 1860, when Denver’s dirt streets were lined with saloons and shanties, two officials decided to settle their political differences through a duel. When the roar of the shotguns subsided, one duelist was still standing and the other lay writhing on the ground. The man was eventually taken to a frontier hospital where two doctors bound up his wounds and did everything they could to heal him. Medicine was still more art than science back then and the man died.
The frontier hospital was a precursor to Denver Health, which has survived and treated countless gunshot victims, as well as patients afflicted with other serious wounds and illnesses. Located just west of Speer Boulevard, between Sixth and Eighth avenues, the hospital is one of the city’s oldest institutions and one of its greatest resources. … “
“In these pages, you will read about the hospital’s rough-and-tumble beginnings, its near-death in the 1950s, and its rebirth at the dawn of the twenty-first century. …”

3rd floor Special Collections – History of Medicine OVERSIZE – WAR WX 28 AC6 D4 D416W 2011

Special Collection Featured Book for January

Revolutionary Medicine: the Founding Fathers and Mothers in Sickness and in Health
Revolutionary medicine
by Jeanne E. Abrams

“Before the advent of modern antibiotics, one’s life could be abruptly shattered by contagion and death, and debility from infectious diseases and epidemics was commonplace for early Americans, regardless of social status. Concerns over health affected the founding fathers and their families as it did slaves, merchants, immigrants, and everyone else in North America. As both victims of illness and national leaders, the Founders occupied a unique position regarding the development of public health in America. Revolutionary Medicine refocuses the study of the lives of George and Martha Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John and Abigail Adams, and James and Dolley Madison away from the usual lens of politics to the unique perspective of sickness, health, and medicine in their era.

For the founders, republican ideals fostered a reciprocal connection between individual health and the “health” of the nation. Studying the encounters of these American founders with illness and disease, as well as their viewpoints about good health, not only provides us with a richer and more nuanced insight into their lives, but also opens a window into the practice of medicine in the eighteenth century, which is at once intimate, personal, and first hand. …”

Medical Humanities / Special Collections 3rd floor
WZ 313 A1614r 2013

Rare Book Profile: Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent’s A Choice Manual, or, Rare and Select Secrets in Physick and Chirurgery.

Elizabeth Grey’s A Choice Manual, or, Rare and Select Secrets in Physick and Chirurgery (London: Gartrude Dawson, 1659) is a collection of household recipes, published with her A True Gentlewomans Delight, Wherein is Contained all Manner of Cookery. The collections were edited with additions by W. Jar,” a professor of physick.” While A Choice Manual and A True Gentlewoman’s Delight have separate title pages and pagination, and are sometimes bound separately, they were printed and sold as a single work. The first part is mainly medicinal, while the second is entirely culinary, although some of the ingredients in the medicinal recipes now seem more like food than medicine.
ElizabethGreyFront
Elizabeth Talbot Grey (1581-1651) was the eldest daughter of Gilbert Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, and a granddaughter of Bess of Hardwick. She married Henry Grey, Earl of Kent in 1601. She was well educated, a patron of scholars and poets, and the employer of Robert May, famous for his book The Accomplisht Cook (1660). She was known for her medical knowledge. Her sister, Alethea Howard, Countess of Arundel, shared her interests, and published her own recipe collection, Natura Exenterata. A True Gentlewomans Delight includes a recipe for Lady of Arundels Manchet (white bread).

The first edition of the Countess’s compilation was printed in 1653 by Gartrude Dawson, who took over her husband’s London print shop after his death. Instead of addressing a nobleman, the dedication of A Choice Manual is to “the virtuous and most noble Lady, Latitia Popham,” the wife of a supporter of Oliver Cromwell, and A True Gentlewomans Delight is dedicated to Mistress Anne Pile, a baronet’s daughter. The book was a bestseller, with many updated editions. The 22nd and last edition was published in 1726.

The Health Sciences Library’s copy is the 11th edition, published 1659. The title page of the first section and the last 4 pages of the second have been damaged, with a slight loss of text, and the book lacks the Countess’ portrait. It came to the library as a gift from the Denver Medical Society, and was rebound in brown leather by Frank B. Rogers.

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

Indigenous and Integrative Medicine – Special Collections

Featured book from the Strauss / Wisneski Indigenous and Integrative Medicine Collection
Complementary and alternative medicine for older adults AUGUST2013
Complementary and alternative medicine for older adults : a guide to holistic approaches to healthy aging

This new and up-to-the-minute compendium of reliable and authoritative information on complementary and alternative therapies provides you with information that older adults may use as they seek to improve their health and quality of life. This book covers dietary means; physical, mental, and spiritual methods of treatment; and various examples of therapies including:
Acupuncture
Aromatherapy
Art & music
Ayurveda
Homeopathy
Massage
Meditation

Special Collections 3rd floor
WB 890 | C73704 2006