New Exhibit – Dr. Henry Claman (1930-2016)

Dr. Henry Claman was a man of many interests and accomplishments. He was a member of the faculty of the University of Colorado School of Medicine for over 50 years, 25 of them as Head of the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, and he was the driving force behind the establishment of the Arts and Humanities in Healthcare Program on the Anschutz Medical Campus. In support of the program, Dr. Claman and his wife, Dr. Janet Stewart Claman, established The Henry and Janet Claman Medical Humanities Collection at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Library. An exhibit honoring a few of his accomplishments and contributions to his field, to the University, and to the Health Sciences Library is featured in the exhibit case on the 3rd floor, between the elevator and the Special Collections Room.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

New Acquisition: The Fabric of the Human Body, a new translation of Vesalius’ masterwork

2014 marks the 500th anniversary of the birth of physician and anatomist Andreas Vesalius.  Vesalius was a lecturer in anatomy and surgery at the University of Padua. He was an advocate for the study of human anatomy through dissection of human bodies, rather than animals. His great work, De Humani Corporis Fabrica, published in 1543 when he was 28 years old, was not only scientifically revolutionary, but a landmark in printing and art as well.

The Health Sciences Library’s Rare Materials Collection has both the first edition of 1543 and the second edition of 1555. The Fabric of the Human Body, a new annotated translation and facsimile of both editions was recently added to the collection. The two-volume set was purchased with funds from the Charley Smyth Library Endowment, established with the Library by the Anschutz Medical Campus Retired Faculty Association, in memory of colleague and friend Dr. Charley Smyth, former Head of the School of Medicine Division of Rheumatology.

Northwestern University Professors Emeritus Daniel H. Garrison and Malcolm H. Hast spent more than twenty years translating the texts of both the 1543 and the 1555 editions from Latin into English. It is the first translation to include both editions. Modern anatomical terms have been added parenthetically to clarify the sixteenth-century text. Extensive footnotes provide further explanation for modern readers, with highlighting to denote differences between editions. The annotations also incorporate newly discovered notes in Vesalius’ handwriting for a planned but unpublished third edition.

A new font based on the beautiful typeface used in the original publication, Basel Antiqua, was designed specifically for this translation. The illustrations and decorated initials were reproduced using high resolution digital scans, with thumbnails inserted in the margins of the text to help orient the reader.

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The Health Sciences Library will celebrate the birth of Andreas Vesalius on Wednesday, November 19th from 12 to 2 p.m.  in the Library’s Reading Room.  Dr. Gabriel Finkelstein, Associate Professor of history at the University of Colorado Denver will give a lecture, “Vesalius at 500.” The 1543 and 1555 editions of De Humani Corporis Fabrica and The Fabric of the Human Body will be on display, and light refreshments will be served.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

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Library Genie Grants Wish!

In July 2013 the Health Sciences Library asked our users to provide us with three wishes they would request. As a result of 352 submitted wishes we found that many of our users desired additional microwave and refrigerator areas throughout the library. The library genie delivered!

Microwave area located by the private study rooms.

Microwave area located by the private study rooms on the 2nd Floor.

Microwave area located at the north end of the building right next to the elevator on the 3rd floor.

Microwave area located at the north end of the building right next to the elevator on the 3rd floor.

 

There is now a microwave and small refrigerator located on the north end of the library on the 3rd Floor next to the elevator and on the 2nd Floor next to the private study rooms. We’ve noticed a great deal of usage in these two areas and are happy to be able to fulfill such a widespread library wish! Enjoy!

New Exhibit – Picture This: Photographs in 19th Century Illustration

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While they continued to use lithographs, engravings, and woodcuts, nineteenth-century authors and publishers took advantage of advances in photographic and printing technology to improve the accuracy and quality of illustration. A sampling of medical publications from the Health Sciences Library’s Rare Books Collection is featured in the exhibit case on the 3rd floor, between the elevator and the Special Collections Room.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

New Exhibit – They Also Served: Female Nurses in the Civil War (1861-1865)

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During the Civil War, more than two thousand women served as volunteer nurses in military hospitals.  Their work was invaluable to the troops and the physicians who treated them, but also promoted respect for women’s role in medicine, helped establish nursing as a profession in the United States, and advanced the cause of women’s rights in general. A small group of these women represented in the Health Sciences Library’s Rare Books Collection is featured in the exhibit case on the 3rd floor, between the elevator and the Special Collections Room.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]