New History of Infant Feeding Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The Strauss Health Sciences Library is always rotating its exhibits and displays. This is the second of three new exhibits on the history of medicine, all of which can be found in the 2nd Floor Rotunda. Stop by and see them in-person or read more about Medicine Trade Cards and Dissection on the Library News Blog!


For most of history, there was no real alternative to breast feeding. The main reasons were the stigma of not breast feeding, and the lack of research on the subject. There was also no equipment available to artificially feed infants.

For the rich, the ability to hire a wet nurse allowed mothers the freedom to continue their regular lives. For the poor, however, a new baby would tie a mother to the home for years. Industrialization, beginning in the mid-19th century, forced a change in the way infants were raised.

Once women began to enter the work force, breast feeding became harder for working women, and alternatives needed to be found.

Located in the Second Floor rotunda on the South side of the Strauss Health Sciences Library.


This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

New Dissection Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The use of human cadaveric dissection became a tool for teaching anatomy at the University of Montpellier in 1350, and became a fully sanctioned and regular part of anatomy education at the University of Paris in 1407.

By the mid-1800s, dissection to teach anatomy was key to medical education. Although there are several other ways to study anatomy, from books to virtual reality, research shows that dissection is invaluable.

Besides the anatomical knowledge gained, it is important in training empathetic physicians.

Located in the Second Floor rotunda on the South side of the Strauss Health Sciences Library.

This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

New Cytoscopy Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

Modern cystoscopy and endoscopy has its roots in a physician’s need for a better way to examine their patients internally, and the imagination that need drove.

The first scope for examination was created in 1804, and developments have not slowed. 

Visit the second floor rotunda on the South side of the Strauss Health Sciences Library to view a new exhibit exploring the history and development of cystoscopy equipment.

Dr. Kildare Board Game Exhibit on 2nd Floor

Strauss Health Sciences Library’s Collection Development Technician, Paul Andrews is back with a brand new exhibit in the 2nd Floor rotunda!


The Dr. Kildare board game was donated by Dr. Robert H. Shikes. M.D.

Dr. Kildare ran for five seasons on NBC from 1961 to 1966.  The show starred Richard Chamberlin as Dr. James Kildare, a popular character created by writer Frederick Faust, the subject of a series of MGM films and radio series in the 30s and 40s.  Dr. Kildare took place at Blair General Hospital and told the story of a young intern learning how to be a doctor.

The Strauss Health Sciences Library has a Dr. Kildare game that was released by IDEAL in 1962.  The object of the game is to visit the rooms indicated on the Diagnosis Cards and collect Doctor Cards, which mark the rooms you’ve visited.  Once you have visited the thirteen rooms needed to make a diagnosis, you use the wheel to decode what is wrong with your patient.  The first one to collect and decipher their cards is the winner. 

Visit the second floor rotunda, on the south side of the library to view the Dr. Kildare Game exhibit.  If that sparks your need to play a board game, visit the Service Desk on the first floor, where you can check out Scrabble, Yahtzee, Chess, and Operation!


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Colorado Drugstore Bottles

The Colorado drugstore bottles were donated by Dr. Robert H. Shikes. M.D.

Gold was discovered in Colorado in 1859, and a huge influx of prospectors flooded the territory to strike it rich.  Soon Denver, where some of the first traces of gold were found at the confluence of Cherry Creek and the Platte River, became the center of the much of the growth of what would become the state of Colorado.  The new settlers required the services of many professions to help them in their new lives, including doctors and pharmacists.  Soon, the local drugstore was an integral part of the community.

The local drugstore provided the medications locally compounded and placed in unique glass bottles that also served as advertisements.  The local drugstore served the people Colorado up until large chain drugstores began to buy local stores in the early 20th Century.

Visit the South 2nd floor landing to explore some of the Health Sciences Library’s collection of Colorado Drugstore Bottles.

Paul Andrews, MA

Collection Development

New Exhibit Space in the Library

Please visit the Denison Family and Dr. Florence Sabin exhibits at their new home on the first floor of the Health Sciences Library.

Two exhibit cases that were previously in the Reading Room on the third floor have been moved to the first floor.  These exhibit cases explore the histories of the Denison Family and Dr. Florence Sabin, perhaps one of the most famous doctors from Colorado.

Dr. Charles Denison was a prominent Denver physician who also taught, did ground breaking research in climate and tuberculosis, and invented a stethoscope that became a standard in the early 20th century.  In 1924, his wife Ella Strong Denison, donated the funds to build a new medical library in his honor.  The Charles Denison Memorial Library was the health sciences library on the 9th Avenue University of Colorado Health Sciences Center campus until it closed in 2007, when the Health Sciences Library moved to the Anschutz Medical Campus.

Dr. Florence Sabin’s connection to the University of Colorado was a long one.  In 1937, she delivered the keynote address at the dedication of the Charles Denison, M/D. Memorial Library.  On her 80th birthday, a wing of the original University of Colorado hospital was named in her honor.  When the new University of Colorado Hospital was built in 1962, the building became the University of Colorado School of Medicine.  The auditorium that bore Dr. Sabin’s name was used by students until the day the 9th Ave campus was closed.  Many of the artifacts displayed here were housed in the auditorium, and when the campus moved, they became a permanent part of the Health Sciences Library’s collection.

Phrenology – Mid 19th to early 20th century

From the 1840s to the 1920s, the popular medical movement of Phrenology took hold in the U.S. During this time phrenology was similar to pop-psychology. Phrenology was the pseudo-science that claimed to be able to identify a person’s character by the bumps on their skull. The ‘evidence’ was the belief that the brain was made up of 37 unique organs that each controlled a behavior or personality trait. Many practitioners of Phrenology, including most famously the Fowler family, believed that the organs could be exercised and a person could have a better and happier life. It also had contemporary critics and a sinister side.

The Health Science Library has several distinctive artifacts from the mid-19th to early 20th Century practice of Phrenology on exhibit. Please visit the second floor rotunda to experience the past of Phrenology.

Paul Andrews, MA
Collection Development