Staff Holiday Celebrations!

The Strauss Health Sciences Library staff holiday party was this Tuesday! The staff had a potluck, with everyone bringing great dishes!

We started the party off with a round of holiday movie trivia, a guessing game for holiday carols, and a round of door prizes for all staff in attendance.

Director Melissa De Santis also used this time to recognize and celebrate staff members with 5, 10, 15, or 20 years of service to the University of Colorado system.

Recognizing Thinh Le, Senior Systems Administrator in Information Technology for 20 years with the University of Colorado!

To wrap up the party, people passed out their Secret Santa gifts, and a few daring individuals took part in a fun game of White Elephant!

The leopard-print “Slanket” was a hotly contested item in the White Elephant gift exchange.

In all, it was a great way to get the whole staff together to unwind, celebrate our accomplishments, and start looking forward to the new year!

Colorado Drugstore Bottles

The Colorado drugstore bottles were donated by Dr. Robert H. Shikes. M.D.

Gold was discovered in Colorado in 1859, and a huge influx of prospectors flooded the territory to strike it rich.  Soon Denver, where some of the first traces of gold were found at the confluence of Cherry Creek and the Platte River, became the center of the much of the growth of what would become the state of Colorado.  The new settlers required the services of many professions to help them in their new lives, including doctors and pharmacists.  Soon, the local drugstore was an integral part of the community.

The local drugstore provided the medications locally compounded and placed in unique glass bottles that also served as advertisements.  The local drugstore served the people Colorado up until large chain drugstores began to buy local stores in the early 20th Century.

Visit the South 2nd floor landing to explore some of the Health Sciences Library’s collection of Colorado Drugstore Bottles.

Paul Andrews, MA

Collection Development

New Exhibit Space in the Library

Please visit the Denison Family and Dr. Florence Sabin exhibits at their new home on the first floor of the Health Sciences Library.

Two exhibit cases that were previously in the Reading Room on the third floor have been moved to the first floor.  These exhibit cases explore the histories of the Denison Family and Dr. Florence Sabin, perhaps one of the most famous doctors from Colorado.

Dr. Charles Denison was a prominent Denver physician who also taught, did ground breaking research in climate and tuberculosis, and invented a stethoscope that became a standard in the early 20th century.  In 1924, his wife Ella Strong Denison, donated the funds to build a new medical library in his honor.  The Charles Denison Memorial Library was the health sciences library on the 9th Avenue University of Colorado Health Sciences Center campus until it closed in 2007, when the Health Sciences Library moved to the Anschutz Medical Campus.

Dr. Florence Sabin’s connection to the University of Colorado was a long one.  In 1937, she delivered the keynote address at the dedication of the Charles Denison, M/D. Memorial Library.  On her 80th birthday, a wing of the original University of Colorado hospital was named in her honor.  When the new University of Colorado Hospital was built in 1962, the building became the University of Colorado School of Medicine.  The auditorium that bore Dr. Sabin’s name was used by students until the day the 9th Ave campus was closed.  Many of the artifacts displayed here were housed in the auditorium, and when the campus moved, they became a permanent part of the Health Sciences Library’s collection.

Fun, Weird Words

For the second installment of our Fun, Weird Words, I thought I’d share…

Hum Durgeon — an imaginary illness, from the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

Frobly-mobly — feeling neither well nor unwell, from the 18th Century. The modern version, I think, would be “meh”

And my personal favorite (if only I could remember it so early in the morning) is:

Dysania — extreme difficulty getting out of bed (especially in the morning), from the early 1900’s

Connecting Papers to the Library Proxy: Updated

Since the recent change to the Health Sciences Library proxy server, we’ve received numerous connectivity error reports from users of the citation management software Papers. While we are more than happy to assist with issues related to the proxy link, please keep in mind that the library does not provide in-depth support or troubleshooting for Papers. If you would like to use a citation management program that the library does support and troubleshoot for, we recommend switching to EndNote. You can find more information about EndNote here: http://hslibraryguides.ucdenver.edu/endnote/cuanschutz

Update: Starting in April, the VPN will no longer work with Papers to provide full text. You will need to fill in the Proxy information in Papers to get full text access through the library.


The Health Sciences Library proxy link has changed. To update your Papers library to remain connected to the Health Sciences Library, complete the following steps to update your Proxy settings.

  1. Access the settings box for Papers by following this path: Papers (main menu) – Preferences – Access
    Step 1
  2. In the “Use Library Proxy” menu, select: Other
    Step 2
  3. Enter the following Proxy details:
    1. Institution: University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
    2. [Updated – use this URL not the one pictured below] EXProxy URL: https://proxy.hsl.ucdenver.edu/login?url=%@Step 3
  4. Click “Done” at the bottom.
  5. On the “Access” screen, your “Use Library Proxy” box should now say: Other: University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
  6. Now fill in the Library Website URL: https://hslibrary.ucdenver.edu/
    Step 6
  7. You have now set up your Library Proxy access!  You can close the settings box.

If you have any questions about the Proxy link, you can contact AskUs at 303-255-2152 or askus@hsl.ucdenver.libanswers.com.

Fun, Weird Words

After recently coming across the 13th century term “forswunk” on the “British Medieval History” Facebook page, and sharing its delightful meaning with coworkers (“exhausted from too much work. To be ‘foreswunk’ is to be exhausted before you even begin”), we decided to share this and other fun, weird, and wonky work- or medically-relevant words with our wider readership.  Here are a couple to go along with ‘foreswunk’:

Fudgel (18th C): the act of giving the impression of working, but actually doing nothing.

Perendinate (19th C): to put off, specifically until the day-after-tomorrow.

Keep Up with The Appendix

Students, Staff, and Faculty, there’s a great way to keep up with the happenings of the Health Sciences Library and the Anschutz Medical Campus: subscribe to the monthly Newsletter, the Appendix! You’ll find info on upcoming events, great new resources, staff bios, suggestions for easier access, improved services, and more! The highlights of our blog, compiled and delivered directly to your inbox. The subscription process is easy, and if you change your mind down the road, so is unsubscribing. (Although we will be sorry to see you go!) Browse through our past issues, and subscribe here!

Featured book for October

Couch_Fiction

Story by Philippa Perry

“Ever wanted an insight into counselling?  Or wished you could be a ‘fly-on-the-wall’ in a psychotherapy session?  Couch Fiction allows you to peep through the keyhole of the therapy room door and, more than that, read the minds of the protagonists…

Based on a case study of Pat (our sandal-wearing, cat-loving psychotherapist) and her new client, James (an ambitious barrister with a potentially harmful habit he can’t stop), this graphic novel follows the anxieties, frustrations, mind-wanderings and break-throughs of each, through a year of therapy sessions together. Beautifully illustrated and accompanied by succinct and illuminating footnotes, this book offers a witty and thought-provoking exploration of the therapeutic journey, considering a range of skills, insights and techniques along the way.”

Medical Humanities 3rd floor
WM 420 P464c 2010

“The Highest and Healthiest State”

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY
10TH ANNIVERSARY
LECTURE SERIES
“The Highest & Healthiest State”
Tom Noel, PhD
Professor of History, Director of Public History, Preservation and Colorado Studies
University of Colorado Denver

A quick, lighthearted overview of medicine in the highest state from Native American physicians to the Anschutz Medical Campus.

Friday, October 13, 2017
12:00-1:00pm
Reading Room
3rd floor, Health Sciences Library
Lunch provided

Register

Thomas Jacob Noel is a Professor of History and Director of Public History, Preservation & Colorado Studies at the University of Colorado Denver. Tom is the  author or coauthor of 50 books many articles. He was a longtime Sunday columnist for The Denver Post and the Rocky Mountain News. He appears regularly  as “Dr. Colorado” on Channel 9’s “Colorado & Company.” Tom completed his B.A. at the University of Denver and his M.A. and Ph.D. at CU-Boulder where his mother (a psychiatrist) and grandmother (a teacher) also did their graduate work. Please check http://dr-colorado.com/ for a full resume and updated list of his books, classes, tours and talks. Tom’s latest books include A Short History of Denver, Denver Landmarks & Historic Districts. His book, Colorado: A  Historical Atlas, won three prizes as the best regional history book of 2016.

 

–Kristen Desanto

“Louis Pasteur, Artist”

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY
10TH ANNIVERSARY
LECTURE SERIES
“Louis Pasteur, Artist”
Joe Gal, PhD
Professor Emeritus, Department of Pathology
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Louis Pasteur is admired around the world as a benefactor of humanity for his discoveries and inventions in microbiology and infectious diseases. Much less  well known is that he was a talented artist who as a teenager created first-rate images, mostly portraits of family, friends, and town notables, in pastel, charcoal, pencil, and lithography. He abandoned work as an artist at age 20 but maintained close connections to the world of art and artists for the rest of his life.

Friday, October 20, 2017
12:00-1:00pm
Reading Room
3rd floor, Health Sciences Library
Lunch provided

Register

Joseph Gal earned a master’s degree in chemistry at the Illinois Institute of Technology and a PhD in organic chemistry at the University of California Davis.  He then began a career on the faculty of University of Colorado School of Medicine and retired recently as professor emeritus. For many years he has focused  his scholarly activities on the history of science and medicine.

 

–Kristen Desanto

Welcome to Anschutz! Tips for New Students, Faculty, and Staff

Now that you’ve had a little time to settle in, purchase your textbooks, and figure out where you can get lunch, we want to extend a warm welcome from the faculty and staff at your Health Sciences Library here on campus! The Health Sciences Library website is the gateway for many resources you’ll use for your studies and research.

From our website, you can:

  • Access library resources (using your PassportID credentials if you’re off-campus)
  • Click the Ask Us! link to contact a librarian by phone, chat, or email for quick questions, customized one-on-one research consultation appointments, or anything else you may need help with
  • Review our Getting Started at the Library & Finding Full Text Online resource guide to learn essential skills for new library users (other tutorials and classes are available)
  • Use SearchHSL from the homepage to explore electronic books, journals, and other resources that contain information on your research topic
  • Register for “Getting Started At The Library” or sign up for other library classes for help with PubMed, EndNote, and other resources
  • Renew your library books online, and get copies of materials that CU does not own from a wide network of libraries using Interlibrary Loan
  • Find an electronic textbook to help you study and learn!

Although you can get to most Library resources without ever leaving your home, there are many reasons to visit the Library:

  • Access library resources from your laptop via the campus WiFi
  • Check out laptops with pre-loaded applications, art, and productivity tools for 5 days!
  • Use any of 48 computer workstations in the Information Commons, some with unique software like SPSS and SAS, VH Dissector Pro, and MS Office. One workstation is equipped with ZoomText for the visually impaired and four have document scanners
  • Get help locating evidence-based information, clinical care information, or primary source articles
  • Reserve one of our group study rooms  (majority of rooms are first-come-first-served).
  • You can connect your laptop to the flat-panel LCD screens to display a presentation or website, or use the mobile whiteboards to facilitate group study sessions (check out dry erase markers from the Service Desk)
  • Study or take a break outdoors on any one of several library patios. Wireless internet and electrical outlets are available on the patios
  • Reserve one of the library’s several meeting rooms for your group meeting of 12-50 participants

Especially for students:

 The Health Sciences Library offers many services specifically for students:

 Especially for Staff and Faculty!

If you have any questions at all, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We are here to help you! Best wishes on your new journey and we’ll look forward to seeing you in the library.