New Resource: Improve Your Medical Spanish with Canopy

The library has access to a new Spanish language resource, Canopy.

Canopy is a web-based medical Spanish training tool that teaches and provides practice for specialized medical concepts and terminology for common clinical scenarios. By beginning with a Medical Spanish Assessment, Canopy will recommend where to begin your training. The course provides three levels of learning with numerous lessons in each level catered to specific skills and vocabulary. The lessons are interactive and include practice for both written and spoken language.

You can find Canopy listed on our databases page .

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Don’t want to work through the whole program? Skip around to the chapters that are most relevant to your practice!

Interested in trying out this new tool and improving your Spanish language skills for clinical practice? Contact Kristina Palmer at kristina.palmer@ucdenver.edu using your UCDenver email address to request your Canopy account.

Have you tried Canopy? Let us know what you think using the TellUs form.

Connect Your Laptop Workstations

Working on something big? The Health Sciences Library is thrilled to offer full-size screens, keyboards, and mice at our brand new “Connect Your Laptop Workstations.” Connect your laptop using the cables provided and you’ll have a full 27” monitor to display your work in parallel or as an extended screen. Plus, whether you’re working with a brand new laptop or an older model, the HSL has a wide variety of adapters for checkout at the service desk to connect you to the workstations.

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Here’s how it works. The four Connect Your Laptop Workstations are located in the fourth pod of the north computer commons, next to the north printer station. Note the yellow placards on the table partitions. The four cables at the station are: USB3, connecting the keyboard and mouse to your laptop; VGA, connecting the monitor to an older laptop; HDMI, connecting high-definition video on newer laptops; and Mini Display Port, connecting video for a wide range of Apple products.

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Working with a brand new laptop and only have USB-C connections? Just check out an OMARS multi-port adapter from the service desk! This will allow you to use HDMI video, USB for keyboard/mouse, and still leave ports open for charging and connecting other devices.

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If you have any problems or need help getting started with a Connect Your Laptop Workstation, don’t hesitate to ask for assistance at the service desk during public access hours. If you have suggestions for this space or ideas on what technologies would be useful to you, let us know with a Tell Us comment!

What’s Happening in the Reading Room?

If you took a walk up to the third floor throughout the months of June and July, you probably noticed some big changes happening around the Reading Room and Art Gallery! The Health Sciences Library, in conjunction with University Facilities, have been making some big quality of life improvements to this popular space, from the addition of several new power outlets along the floors to the removal of the superficial pillars throughout the room, and we’re thrilled to present the new, multi-functional Reading Room!

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Along with the floor plan renovations, we also added brand new collapsible, modular tables and chairs, allowing for more possible room configurations than ever before. Without the bulky tables and chairs of years past, rearranging the whole room for your EMS reservation or an impromptu group meeting will be a snap!

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We have just a few more finishing touches for the room, but feel free to wander up to the third floor and check it out! The room’s daily schedule is posted on the outer door, and if it is not currently being reserved, you’re welcome to explore the space. We’ll be adding more pictures and posts to the HSL Blog as we start experimenting with different table layouts, including some brand new hex-shaped tables, great for small break-out groups.

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If you have any questions about making a room reservation through EMS—in the Reading Room or elsewhere—please reach out to Access Services by visiting the front desk or calling 303-724-2152 during regular business hours.

Colorado Drugstore Bottles

Gold was discovered in Colorado in 1859, and a huge influx of prospectors flooded the territory to strike it rich.  Soon Denver, where some of the first traces of gold were found at the confluence of Cherry Creek and the Platte River, became the center of the much of the growth of what would become the state of Colorado.  The new settlers required the services of many professions to help them in their new lives, including doctors and pharmacists.  Soon, the local drugstore was an integral part of the community.

 

The local drugstore provided the medications locally compounded and placed in unique glass bottles that also served as advertisements.  The local drugstore served the people Colorado up until large chain drugstores began to buy local stores in the early 20th Century.

 

Visit the South 2nd floor landing to explore some of the Health Sciences Library’s collection of Colorado Drugstore Bottles.

 

Paul Andrews, MA

Collection Development

New Exhibit Space in the Library

Please visit the Denison Family and Dr. Florence Sabin exhibits at their new home on the first floor of the Health Sciences Library.

Two exhibit cases that were previously in the Reading Room on the third floor have been moved to the first floor.  These exhibit cases explore the histories of the Denison Family and Dr. Florence Sabin, perhaps one of the most famous doctors from Colorado.

Dr. Charles Denison was a prominent Denver physician who also taught, did ground breaking research in climate and tuberculosis, and invented a stethoscope that became a standard in the early 20th century.  In 1924, his wife Ella Strong Denison, donated the funds to build a new medical library in his honor.  The Charles Denison Memorial Library was the health sciences library on the 9th Avenue University of Colorado Health Sciences Center campus until it closed in 2007, when the Health Sciences Library moved to the Anschutz Medical Campus.

Dr. Florence Sabin’s connection to the University of Colorado was a long one.  In 1937, she delivered the keynote address at the dedication of the Charles Denison, M/D. Memorial Library.  On her 80th birthday, a wing of the original University of Colorado hospital was named in her honor.  When the new University of Colorado Hospital was built in 1962, the building became the University of Colorado School of Medicine.  The auditorium that bore Dr. Sabin’s name was used by students until the day the 9th Ave campus was closed.  Many of the artifacts displayed here were housed in the auditorium, and when the campus moved, they became a permanent part of the Health Sciences Library’s collection.

Fun, Weird Words

For the second installment of our Fun, Weird Words, I thought I’d share…

Hum Durgeon — an imaginary illness, from the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

Frobly-mobly — feeling neither well nor unwell, from the 18th Century. The modern version, I think, would be “meh”

And my personal favorite (if only I could remember it so early in the morning) is:

Dysania — extreme difficulty getting out of bed (especially in the morning), from the early 1900’s