New History of Infant Feeding Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The Strauss Health Sciences Library is always rotating its exhibits and displays. This is the second of three new exhibits on the history of medicine, all of which can be found in the 2nd Floor Rotunda. Stop by and see them in-person or read more about Medicine Trade Cards and Dissection on the Library News Blog!


For most of history, there was no real alternative to breast feeding. The main reasons were the stigma of not breast feeding, and the lack of research on the subject. There was also no equipment available to artificially feed infants.

For the rich, the ability to hire a wet nurse allowed mothers the freedom to continue their regular lives. For the poor, however, a new baby would tie a mother to the home for years. Industrialization, beginning in the mid-19th century, forced a change in the way infants were raised.

Once women began to enter the work force, breast feeding became harder for working women, and alternatives needed to be found.

Located in the Second Floor rotunda on the South side of the Strauss Health Sciences Library.


This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

Public Domain Day 2020

When discussing OER, we often devote a lot of time to Creative Commons licenses which are excellent tools for bestowing creative works with the 5R’s (Reuse, Remix, Revise, Retain, & Redistribute). However, in addition to Creative Commons, there is an even older designation that grants the privileges of the 5R’s with absolutely zero limits.

It is the public domain!

Public domain transfers all of the copyrights that were originally granted to an author (reproduction of the work, public performances of the work, translation of the work, adaptation of the work, etc…) to the public, in other words, works in the public domain are no longer copyrighted. Therefore anything in the public domain is perfectly poised to be utilized as an OER.

Due to the Sony Bono Copyright Extension Act of 1998, the United States public domain was frozen for a twenty year period. January 1st , 2019 was the first year that a large swath of creative works entered the public domain, specifically works from 1923 including Robert Frost’s poem “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening” and Cecile B. DeMille’s The Ten Commandments. These works and anything else published before 1923 can be freely posted to the internet for public use and interpretation.

Which brings us to…Public Domain Day 2020!

On January 1st, 2020, works published in 1924 will finally enter the public domain, including:

File:The Box-Car Children-1924.jpg

The Box-Car Children Book 1

Desire Under the Elms

It Had to Be You*

The Land that Time Forgot

The Navigator

A Passage to India

Peter Pan

Poirot Investigates

Rhapsody in Blue*

Tarzan and the Ant Man

File:Tarzan the Ape Man (1932) Trailer - Johnny Weissmuller.jpg

So this New Year’s Day, in addition to watching the Rose Bowl and eating black-eyed peas, you can enjoy the newly increased wealth of creative works that now belong to you, the public. You could film an adaptation of The Box-Car Children and score it with Rhapsody in Blue and have Poirot make an appearance. You could publicly recite a passage from A Passage to India. You get to decide because you have the power, the power of the public domain.

Piano, Music Score, Music Sheet, Keyboard, Piano Keys
Image by Steve Buissinne from Pixabay

*Note – for musical works it is only the composition that is entering the public domain, not recordings.

Works Cited

Douglas, N. (2019). These 1924 Copyrighted Works Enter the Public Domain in 2020. Retrieved from https://lifehacker.com/these-1924-copyrighted-works-enter-the-public-domain-in-1839612665

Stanford University Libraries. (2019). Welcome to the Public Domain. Retrieved from https://fairuse.stanford.edu/overview/public-domain/welcome/

This was written by Ellie, you can contact AskUs with questions.

New Medicine Trade Cards Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The Strauss Health Sciences Library is always rotating its exhibits and displays. This is the second of three new exhibits on the history of medicine, all of which can be found in the 2nd Floor Rotunda. Check back next week for more information on the third exhibit!


Before the Food and Drug Administration, which was created in 1906, was given the mandate to rigorously regulate drugs, and the wild claims of medicine makers, “patent,” better described as proprietary, medicines could be found in every pharmacy and medicine show in the United States.  

One of the major elements of proprietary medicine in the United States was the trademarks on labels, letter fonts, and imagery on their products.

Hand in hand with selling their “miracle cures” in drugstores and traveling medicine shows, patent medicine makers used advertising in any form they could. One of the methods were trade cards.

Trade cards were small print ads given out at pharmacies that were very colorful, and often used imagery of women, children, and domestic life.

This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

New Dissection Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The use of human cadaveric dissection became a tool for teaching anatomy at the University of Montpellier in 1350, and became a fully sanctioned and regular part of anatomy education at the University of Paris in 1407.

By the mid-1800s, dissection to teach anatomy was key to medical education. Although there are several other ways to study anatomy, from books to virtual reality, research shows that dissection is invaluable.

Besides the anatomical knowledge gained, it is important in training empathetic physicians.

Located in the Second Floor rotunda on the South side of the Strauss Health Sciences Library.

This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

FY20 Library Subscriptions Survey

Due to budget constraints and the increasing cost of library resources, the Strauss Health Sciences Library is seeking feedback on the usefulness and importance of selected resources (journal packages, databases, etc.) via a Qualtrics survey:

https://ucdenver.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_a8Eo968STbkRMWh

This survey is password protected.  You may find the password in the Nov. 21 Academic Announcements email titled “FY20 Library Subscriptions Survey”, or you can email AskUs (askus@hsl.ucdenver.libanswers.com) to get the password.

This seven-question survey should take about 10-15 minutes to complete. Please respond to the survey by Thursday, December 12th.

Questions or comments about this survey or any library resource can be sent to Yumin Jiang, Head of Collection Management. She can be reached at yumin.jiang@cuanschutz.edu or (303) 724-2137.

This was written by Yumin, you can contact AskUs with questions.

PubMed Changes are Coming

November Updates

A bit behind schedule but finally here, you can now find the new PubMed interface from the current PubMed browser.

Find the new PubMed interface

The new interface was built using modern web standards with a responsive layout, so it works more effectively on cell phones and tablets.

The updated Best Match sort uses a machine learning algorithm to elevate the most relevant articles to the top of your results list.

Starting in Spring 2020, this new interface will be the default for all PubMed users.

Read more about the changes to the interface from the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Have questions or feedback about the new PubMed interface? Contact NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback.

This was written by Christi Piper, you can contact AskUs with questions.

September Updates

The new PubMed is going live this month! Are you ready?

We will use this space to keep you updated on the changes that occurring and provide tips and tricks for using the new interface. You can interact with the beta version of the new PubMed by visiting PubMed Labs. As you use the new interface, please provide NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback as they will continue to make improvements to the interface until it becomes the default in January 2020.

Keep in mind that the beta interface is not currently a replacement for the current version of PubMed since it is not the complete database in regards to content or functionality yet.

Here are the most recent features that have been added to the new PubMed interface:

  • Filters have been added to narrow results by article type, text availability, publication date, species, language, sex, subject, journal category and age.
  • The Health Sciences Article Linker has been added! You can now get to our library holdings from the beta PubMed version.

Keep an eye on the library homepage for information about the new PubMed and quick links to access the site.

This was written by Ellie, you can contact AskUs with questions.

July Updates

In Fall/Winter 2019, PubMed will be undergoing some changes to the interface. If you want to see some of the changes that are coming before the current version of PubMed is replaced, you can visit PubMed Labs, the experimental platform that has some of the major updates already available.

Wondering what’s new? Here are some of the updated features:

Enhanced Search Results

The new version of PubMed (currently PubMed Labs) will have an enhanced relevant sort option, named Best Match, that ranks search results according to several relevance signals, including an article’s popularity, its publication date and type, and its query-document relevant score.

The search results page will now automatically include highlighted text fragments from the article abstract that are selected based on relevance to the search.

Responsive Design

Have you ever tried to use PubMed on your phone or tablet? The current version doesn’t work very well, but the new version of PubMed will feature a mobile-first responsive layout that offers better support for smaller device screens. The new interface will be compatible with any screen size no matter how you access PubMed.

Want to learn more about the new PubMed interface/PubMed Labs? Visit the NLM Technical Bulletin , where this information was taken from, for more details.

Have questions or feedback about the new PubMed interface? Contact NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback.

This was written by Christi Piper, you can contact AskUs with questions.

Just in Time for Fall Finals: Alliance of Therapy Dogs Returns to Strauss Library!

Fall finals are coming—but so are the Alliance of Therapy Dog teams!

Join us at the Strauss Health Sciences Library on December 4th from 11:30am – 1:30pm in the student lounge to PAWS and relax! This was a very popular activity at the library’s spring DeStress@Strauss event, so we’re bringing it back.

In May, we had 86 visitors, of whom 51% reported “no stress” after visiting with the dog teams. 20 of you requested dogs “All the Time.” Well, we can’t do all the time, but we can do December 4th!  

Follow the Strauss Library on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to keep up to date with all of the happenings @ Strauss!

This was written by Tina, you can contact AskUs with questions.