Medical Reference Materials

The Medical Reference Materials Page of the Online Reference Resource guide has many useful databases and web pages that you may not know about. From general topics lice biology to a section on communicable diseases, as well as sections for all of the systems of the body, there is help on this page for your medical questions. Each of the entries has a link to the resource as well as a short description of what type of information you can find in that resource.

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The quick selection on the side will let you see what sections are available and quickly jump to the section you need. Some of the more useful resources on this page include

  • Lippincott’s Video Series: Nursing Procedures 2009Step by step guidance for nursing procedures that are performed in realistic clinical settings. Each video reviews key points, shows the procedures, and provides procedure modification for unexpected situations.
  • New England Journal of Medicine: Videos in Clinical MedicineA collection of instructional videos that guide clinical health care professionals through the steps, different approaches, and techniques involved in a variety of procedures. Videos are supplemented by reference materials, cited articles, and written overviews of the video.

This page is a good resource for reference and research questions, but it also contains information on grant and funding resources. If what you are looking for is specifically funding information the Online Reference Resource guide does have a page dedicated just to grants and funding as well as links to the financial aid and scholarship resource office.

Getting full text through Google Scholar

Google Scholar is a great resource for a lot of things — however, at first glance, it might not seem like it’s very easy to get access to the full text of most articles.

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But did you know that you can have Google Scholar provide you with the same Article Linker button that you click to access full text in other databases like PubMed? Which means you can easily access all of our subscription articles — right from Google Scholar?!

It’s super easy. You just have to turn this function on. (It’s best if you’re signed into your Google account in your web browser, so that your browser remembers this setting every time you open it. Cookies must also be enabled on your browser in order for this to work.)

Go to scholar.google.com. Click the “settings” button at the top of the page.

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Click the “library links” button.

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Type “anschutz” into the search bar, then click the search button. Our library should come up. Click the checkbox, and then click save. (Leave the “WorldCat” option checked too).

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That’s it! You’re done! Now when you search in Google Scholar, the results page should look like this:

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You can click those “Full Text @ CU Anschutz” buttons to check and see if we have a subscription that gives us access to the full text of the article. When you’re off campus and you click those buttons, you should be prompted to log in using your CU Anschutz (PassportID) credentials in order to access full text.

If we don’t have an article you want, feel free to request it through Interlibrary Loan.

Remember, if you’re having trouble, please don’t hesitate to ask us for help!

 

Student Staff Bio: Katee Wensinger

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Continuing the series of Student Staff Bios, we have the fabulous Katee Wensinger! Katee is brand new to the library and is learning fast. She likes to hike in the Summer, ski in the Winter, play outside with her dog Bella and explore Denver’s downtown with her boyfriend. Her favorite part of working at the Health Sciences library so far is getting to know more about the services the Health Sciences Library offers. “There are so many cool services that I never knew about, but will definitely take advantage of now.”

Embed the NCBI Sequence Viewer into Your Pages

Search NCBI

Clear input

The newest video on the NCBI YouTube channel introduces the Sequence Viewer embedding API. A few quick examples illustrate how easy it is to embed Sequence Viewer into your own pages.

Sequence Viewer is a graphical view of sequences and color-coded annotations on regions of sequences stored in the Nucleotide and Protein databases.

Subscribe to the NCBI YouTube channel to receive alerts about new videos ranging from quick tips to full webinar presentations.

5 Questions you can answer using Gene

The Gene resource from NCBI is a central hub for accessing nearly all molecular and literature resources for a particular gene. You can easily answer the most common questions and perform the most common tasks by starting in Gene.

In this webinar you will learn about the structure and contents of the Gene resource and how to use Gene to answer the following questions about a gene:

  • Where is the gene located (chromosome and position) in the genome assembly?
  • What are the Reference genomic, transcript and protein sequences for the gene?
  • What variations are present in the gene and are they associated with disease?
  • In what tissues and under what conditions is the gene expressed?
  • What are the equivalent genes (homologs) in other species?

Presenters:

Peter Cooper and Bonnie Maidak, NCBI

Class Details:

Mar 9, 2017

1:00PM – 2:00PM ET

Registration: https://nnlm.gov/class/five-questions-you-can-answer-using-ncbi-gene-database/7094

 

Art from the CU Denver Anschutz Medical Campus Community 2017

Come see this exhibit of art by members of the CU Anschutz community! On view in the library’s 3rd-floor gallery through March 31st. Here’s a sneak peek of some of the art (and artists) included. There are some great deals on art for your home or for a loved one!

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Guests admiring the show at the opening reception, January 26th, 2017

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While you are here we can swim in the sea, 21″x38″ & Gone with the wind, 11″x35.” Tapestry-soumak by Gina Clayton

 

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Defiance, 20″x30.” Photography by Kelsey Weigel

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Raven’s Wish, 6″x8.” Colored Pencil and ink by Barabara Sanchez

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Morning over the bells, 60″x40.” Photograph on acrylic by Kyle Kenyon

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New Zealand Glacier, 12″x14.” Oil on canvas by Alicia Vagts

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Grape Leaves, 9″x12.” Graphite on paper by Lilian Hoffecker

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Broken, 23″x35.” Acrylic, ink and pastel on yupo by SaraMarie Bottaro

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Ray of Hope, Moraine Park, and Arches National Park, all 11″x14.” Photographs by Trudy Boudreau

Come see this beautiful work, and many more pieces, in person at the Health Sciences Library!

 

ScienceDirect problems with Article Linker

UPDATE: ScienceDirect reports that they have fixed the problem. If you still encounter any problems, please contact the library.

ScienceDirect articles are having problems linking through Article Linker. Users are seeing this error message:

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Workaround #1: (on campus, within the campus network, or if off campus – using Google Scholar preferences to select HSL as your library) Click on the link to search Google Scholar:
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Next, click on the article title and NOT the Full text@Anschutz link or you will just circle back:

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Workaround #2: (either on or off campus) try to go to the journal and click down to your article:

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If you need assistance, please contact the library. ScienceDirect is working to correct this error and we will update this post with any news.