Interlibrary Loan (ILL) Services during closure due to COVID-19

ILL staff are here to help you get information you need.  However, due to conditions on campus, processing may be slower than usual. 

Journal articles in print volumes at Strauss Library and PASCAL (Storage) are unavailable to be scanned.  We may be able to borrow from other libraries and have options beyond that if your need is critical.  Book loans from other libraries are unavailable at this time, and hold requests for books in the Strauss collection are not able to be processed either. 

However, we are online and are still providing ILL services M-F, 8am-5pm.  We feel confident we can provide most journal articles.  Other libraries, nationally, may have the article or book chapter you need available electronically.  As well, requests for articles held in our e-journal collections will be processed.

If you don’t have an ILLiad account and are affiliated with Anschutz, feel free to register though our ILLiad website:

https://library-cuanschutz.illiad.oclc.org/illiad/firsttime.html

If you have any questions email copydocs@ucdenver.edu or call 303-724-2111 to speak with Lynn Triefus, ILL Coordinator, about your need.

This was written by Lynn, you can contact AskUs with questions.

Connect to full text articles easily using LibKey Nomad (Chrome browser extension)

LibKey Nomad, created by Third Iron (creators of BrowZine), is a Chrome browser extension that provides instant links to full text articles subscribed to by the Strauss Health Sciences Library as well as open access articles.

Click here to add the LibKey Nomad Chrome browser extension.

After adding the extension to Chrome be sure to select our institution (“University of Colorado Health Sciences Library”) from the dropdown available on the extension set-up page:

Image of LibKey Nomad screen indicating to select your institution

After the extension has been added and you’ve selected our institution you’ll begin seeing “Download PDF” buttons when looking at article abstracts in PubMed:

Image of PubMed interface with LibKey "Download PDF" button

If the PDF of an article is not available through the Strauss Health Sciences Library subscriptions nor is open access, you will see a button called “Access Options…”:

Image of LibKey Nomad button "Access Options" within the PubMed interface

The “Access Options…” button will direct you to the Strauss Health Sciences Library catalog, Library Search, to confirm we do not have access and provide the option to request the article via InterLibrary Loan (ILL). 

Additionally, if you are a vendor’s site for an article and full text is available, you will see a “Download PDF” button in the lower left side of Chrome. 

Image of ScienceDirect page with "Download PDF" button

If you are off campus when using LibKey Nomad, and have not yet logged in to proxy, the first licensed content button that you access through LibKey during your browser session will redirect you through our EZProxy login page. As long as you do not close your browser you will not be asked to log in through proxy again during the current browser session.

If you encounter any issues please submit a help case and library staff will assist.

This was written by Danielle, you can contact AskUs with questions.

Strauss Library is Closed! Most library services available online!

Starting March 16 at 6 p.m. and until further notice, the Strauss Health Sciences Library building is closed, No library services are available in the building. CU Anschutz Badge Access is still allowed. NOTE: Access will be monitored and limited to 7am-midnight, 7 days/week.

While in the library, for your safety, please maintain:

1.      One (1) person per study room

2.      Ten (10) foot distance between others at all times

More information on the CU Anschutz campus response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Even though the building is closed, you can still get help and use the library’s resources online!

This was written by Lisa, you can contact AskUs with questions.

PubMed Changes are Coming

March Updates

By the end of March, the Strauss Health Sciences Library will transition to only linking to the new PubMed interface. So when you access PubMed from the Library, you will directed to the new interface. If you would like to access the legacy interface again before its retirement, you can use the banner in the new PubMed interface to return to the legacy view.

At some point this Spring or Summer, the National Library of Medicine will retire the legacy interface. We will post more specific information about that as we receive it.

If you have any questions about how to use the new PubMed interface, please AskUs!

February Updates

New features have been added to the new PubMed interface!

Items Per Page (see 1)

Display options now include items per page. Ten, twenty, fifty, one hundred, or two hundred results may be displayed per page.

New Sort Options: Publication Date (see 2), Reverse Sort Order (see 3)

In addition to Best match and Most recent, results may now be sorted by publication date either in ascending or descending order.

Download Results by Year as a CSV File (see 4)

The file will include the search query, the year, and the associated record count.

Similar Articles can now be displayed on a new page of results

Clicking “see all similar articles” (see 5) on any article abstract page will open a new results page listing all similar articles.

This was written by Ellie, you can contact AskUs with questions.

November Updates

A bit behind schedule but finally here, you can now find the new PubMed interface from the current PubMed browser.

Find the new PubMed interface

The new interface was built using modern web standards with a responsive layout, so it works more effectively on cell phones and tablets.

The updated Best Match sort uses a machine learning algorithm to elevate the most relevant articles to the top of your results list.

Starting in Spring 2020, this new interface will be the default for all PubMed users.

Read more about the changes to the interface from the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Have questions or feedback about the new PubMed interface? Contact NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback.

This was written by Christi Piper, you can contact AskUs with questions.

September Updates

The new PubMed is going live this month! Are you ready?

We will use this space to keep you updated on the changes that occurring and provide tips and tricks for using the new interface. You can interact with the beta version of the new PubMed by visiting PubMed Labs. As you use the new interface, please provide NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback as they will continue to make improvements to the interface until it becomes the default in January 2020.

Keep in mind that the beta interface is not currently a replacement for the current version of PubMed since it is not the complete database in regards to content or functionality yet.

Here are the most recent features that have been added to the new PubMed interface:

  • Filters have been added to narrow results by article type, text availability, publication date, species, language, sex, subject, journal category and age.
  • The Health Sciences Article Linker has been added! You can now get to our library holdings from the beta PubMed version.

Keep an eye on the library homepage for information about the new PubMed and quick links to access the site.

This was written by Ellie, you can contact AskUs with questions.

July Updates

In Fall/Winter 2019, PubMed will be undergoing some changes to the interface. If you want to see some of the changes that are coming before the current version of PubMed is replaced, you can visit PubMed Labs, the experimental platform that has some of the major updates already available.

Wondering what’s new? Here are some of the updated features:

Enhanced Search Results

The new version of PubMed (currently PubMed Labs) will have an enhanced relevant sort option, named Best Match, that ranks search results according to several relevance signals, including an article’s popularity, its publication date and type, and its query-document relevant score.

The search results page will now automatically include highlighted text fragments from the article abstract that are selected based on relevance to the search.

Responsive Design

Have you ever tried to use PubMed on your phone or tablet? The current version doesn’t work very well, but the new version of PubMed will feature a mobile-first responsive layout that offers better support for smaller device screens. The new interface will be compatible with any screen size no matter how you access PubMed.

Want to learn more about the new PubMed interface/PubMed Labs? Visit the NLM Technical Bulletin , where this information was taken from, for more details.

Have questions or feedback about the new PubMed interface? Contact NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback.

This was written by Christi Piper, you can contact AskUs with questions.

Celebrate Open Access Week by Submitting Your Work(s) to Mountain Scholar

In honor of Open Access Week consider submitting your work(s) to Mountain Scholar. Mountain Scholar is the institutional repository of CU Anschutz and the Strauss Health Sciences Library. Learn more about Mountain Scholar on the Strauss Library’s website.

Submitting your work(s) to Mountain Scholar is easy. In five easy steps you can get your work submitted and made available in Mountain Scholar. A variety of resources can be submitted to Mountain Scholar. Here is a list of some items we accept:

  • Data sets
  • Journal articles (including published material, depending on copyright restrictions)
  • Books and book chapters
  • Pre-prints
  • Multimedia including photos, images, and videos
  • Grey literature
  • Teaching materials and Open Educational Resources (OER)
  • Technical reports
  • Poster and/or slide presentations
  • Professional activity materials
  • Projects and portfolios
  • Performances
  • Special events materials
  • Conference materials
  • Departmental publications

If you still have questions check out our Mountain Scholar FAQ or contact Danielle Ostendorf (Danielle.2.Ostendorf@cuanschutz.edu).

Open Access Week 2019

Every year, during the month of October, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) organizes the international event Open Access Week. For one week we focus on the importance and need for Open Access scholarship and, as SPARC has said, it provides “an opportunity for open access advocates to engage their communities to teach them about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.”

So, how does the Strauss Health Sciences Library support Open Access?

The Strauss Library supports Open Access in several ways. To start, Open Access is part of the Strauss Library’s Collection Development Policy and we regularly make Open Access content available through our library catalog.  Here are some examples of Open Access journals currently available in our catalog:

In addition to providing access to Open Access, the Strauss Library supports the CU Anschutz campus publishing in Open Access journals. If campus affiliates publish in an Open Access journal, depending on their author rights, they can preserve their article in our institutional repository, Mountain Scholar, as well. Learn more about Mountain Scholar.

How is Open Access relevant to the medical and health sciences field?

Open Access is beneficial to all subjects and fields. Allowing your research to be freely available will generally increase citations, support further advances in the field, and increase representation in the field.
Here are examples of Open Access in the medical and health sciences fields:

  • Open Access Research | Gail Rees
    • 3-minute YouTube video about the impact of Dr. Rees’s open access works
  • Open Source Malaria project
    • According to SPARC, it “invites scientists from around the around to freely share their research on anti-malaria drugs through a transparent, online platform. The hope is to accelerate discovery of new drug candidates to be entered into pre-clinical development. All data and ideas are shared openly. There are no patents.”
  • Open Medicine Foundation
    • According to their mission, OMF supports “collaborative medical research to find effective treatments and diagnostic markers for chronic complex diseases with initial focus on ME/CFS.”

This year’s Open Access Week theme is “Open for Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge”. What does that mean?

Every year Open Access Week has a theme. Last year’s theme was “designing equitable foundations for open knowledge.” Nick Shockey, Director of Programs & Engagement at SPARC, explains this year’s theme “Open for Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge”; “As open becomes the default, all stakeholders must be intentional about designing these new, open systems to ensure that they are inclusive, equitable, and truly serve the needs of a diverse global community.”

Equity can play many roles in Open Access publishing. For example, it can refer to the accessibility of a platform hosting an Open Access journal, or the diversity of the editors, peer-reviewers, and authors of an Open Access journal. Open Access also brings equity to a field when all researchers have the same access to research and data. In contrast, accessing a traditional subscription journal requires a subscription which costs the institution, library, or individual money, if they can afford the journal.

How can I learn more about Open Access?

There are several resources available to learn more about Open Access. Here are a few:

If you have questions that were not answered above, please use the Strauss Library’s AskUs to chat or email with a librarian or reach out to Danielle Ostendorf (Danielle.2.Ostendorf@cuanschutz.edu), Electronic Resources Librarian.

New Book List

This was written by Debra, you can contact AskUs with questions.