Welcome to Anschutz! Tips for New Students, Faculty, and Staff

Now that you’ve had a little time to settle in, purchase your textbooks, and figure out where you can get lunch, we want to extend a warm welcome from the faculty and staff at your Health Sciences Library here on campus! The Health Sciences Library website is the gateway for many resources you’ll use for your studies and research.

From our website, you can:

  • Access library resources (using your PassportID credentials if you’re off-campus)
  • Click the Ask Us! link to contact a librarian by phone, chat, or email for quick questions, customized one-on-one research consultation appointments, or anything else you may need help with
  • Review our Getting Started at the Library & Finding Full Text Online resource guide to learn essential skills for new library users (other tutorials and classes are available)
  • Use SearchHSL from the homepage to explore electronic books, journals, and other resources that contain information on your research topic
  • Register for “Getting Started At The Library” or sign up for other library classes for help with PubMed, EndNote, and other resources
  • Renew your library books online, and get copies of materials that CU does not own from a wide network of libraries using Interlibrary Loan
  • Find an electronic textbook to help you study and learn!

Although you can get to most Library resources without ever leaving your home, there are many reasons to visit the Library:

  • Access library resources from your laptop via the campus WiFi
  • Check out laptops with pre-loaded applications, art, and productivity tools for 5 days!
  • Use any of 48 computer workstations in the Information Commons, some with unique software like SPSS and SAS, VH Dissector Pro, and MS Office. One workstation is equipped with ZoomText for the visually impaired and four have document scanners
  • Get help locating evidence-based information, clinical care information, or primary source articles
  • Reserve one of our group study rooms  (majority of rooms are first-come-first-served).
  • You can connect your laptop to the flat-panel LCD screens to display a presentation or website, or use the mobile whiteboards to facilitate group study sessions (check out dry erase markers from the Service Desk)
  • Study or take a break outdoors on any one of several library patios. Wireless internet and electrical outlets are available on the patios
  • Reserve one of the library’s several meeting rooms for your group meeting of 12-50 participants

Especially for students:

 The Health Sciences Library offers many services specifically for students:

 Especially for Staff and Faculty!

If you have any questions at all, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We are here to help you! Best wishes on your new journey and we’ll look forward to seeing you in the library.

New Features for Search@HSL

The HSL online catalog, Search@HSL, has two new features.

The first new feature is the addition of the BrowZine button to the navigation menu.  You can access the additional options in the navigation menu by clicking on the ellipses […]:

Search@HSL(2)

The BrowZine option is now added for easy use:

Browzine

If you click on the link, you will be redirected to the BrowZine main webpage that includes the content available from HSL:

Browzine Webpage

BrowZine is a content aggregator that allows patrons to browse the periodical collection. Users can browse the collection by subject, view the contents of journals, connect to the full text if available, export the citation information, create a personal bookshelf of favorite journals if you create an account, and share content through social media.  BrowZine also offers an app version, where you can select the HSL library and login with your credentials to use BrowZine on your devices.

Browzine on iTunes

 

The second new feature to Search@HSL is the option ‘Fetch Item’ in the navigation menu has been changed to ‘Citation Linker’.

Search@HSL Citation Linker

This option in Search@HSL allows users to find citations for articles, books, and journals.

Citation Linker

Users can search for the item and Search@HSL will find the item in the catalog.  To get the citation, click on the ‘Citation’ icon under the ‘Send to’ menu of the record, and select the citation type you need.  The options are APA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard, and MLA.  Copy the citation and insert into a document.

Citation example

EndNote™ – PDF Harvesting Changes! June 1st is the Drop Dead Date to change!

EndNote Edit Menu - choose Preferences 2017-05-17Many of you use EndNote to harvest or gather PDFs in your EndNote Library.  It’s a huge time saver when you are trying to collect the articles you need for a grant or manuscript. The library has changed how we are able to do this and you need to update your settings as soon as possible. If you don’t make this change, your copy of EndNote will stop harvesting PDFs on June 1st.  Take the time to make this change now, the new URL is already working.

In Endnote, go to the “Edit” drop down menu and choose “Preferences”.

In the EndNote Preferences box, make sure you have “Find Full Text” selected.

EndNote Find-Full-Text-box-2017-05-17

Check all 4 of the checkboxes.  The “OpenURL Path:” field should be

https://primo.hsl.ucdenver.edu/openurl/01UCOHS/01UCOHS?

Copy and paste this into the field or type it very deliberately.  Uppercase matters and must be typed exactly as shown.  Include the “?” at the end.  Please note the URL begins with https.  You only need to fill in the “Authenticate with: URL:” field if you are trying to harvest or gather PDFs when you are not on campus. If you only use EndNote on campus you don’t need to populate this field.  If you are using it, it should be

https://hsl-ezproxy.ucdenver.edu/login

If you need assistance or would like us to help walk you through any of these changes, you can reach the Education & Reference department in the library from 9:00am through 4:00pm at 303-724-2109.

What are your 3 library wishes?

Library Wishes Genie LampIf the Library Genie granted you three library wishes, what would they be?  Now you have the opportunity to let us know!

Submit your three wishes to the library genie today!  Your wishes will be anonymous, but if you’d be willing to talk more with us about your wishes you can include your name and e-mail address.

  • Are there resources or services you’d like to see the library offer?
  • Has the library implemented enhancements that you’d like to see more of?
  • How could the library better assist you with your research, education or clinical needs?

What in the world is ORCiD?

If yorchids-nationalorchidgarden-20041025ou’re thinking that I merely misspelled the name these beautiful flowers,  you’d be mistaken.

ORCiD is a non-profit organization that provides unique identifiers for researchers.

This 16-digit identifier to any research output, such as publications, datasets, posters, basically anything. It’s basically a bar code that you can apply to your work to link you to your accomplishments.

ORCiD is currently being used worldwide. In fact, many publishers and international funding agencies require ORCiD iDs on funding applications and manuscript submissions.

Why are unique identifiers for researchers important?

A major challenge in cataloging research output for individuals and institutions is matching researchers to their output. Currently, the only way we have to distinguish researchers from one another are names and affiliations. This system is problematic for a number of reasons:

  • Names can change over the course of a career. This situation often occurs due to changes in marital status.
  • So do affiliations. Researchers almost certainly change their institution through their MD/PhD and postdoctoral training, but many also have other steps along the way.
  • Names are not unique. Many researchers, even within the same field, have the same or similar names, especially when databases only store first and middle initials.
  • Name formats are often not standardized. Researchers often publish under variations of the same names: some journals include first and middle names, some only accept first, not to mention typos.

To compound this problem, there is no one comprehensive source for all research publications. Thus, automated searches, such as the PubMed search strategy used with Colorado PROFILES, have issues with sensitivity and specificity. Faculty are asked to log in and curate their profiles, but many do not. A widely-used unique identifier for researchers that can travel with a researcher across institutions and can be integrated into many databases would solve this problem.

How does  orcid-logo fit in?

Because ORCiD is an independent non-profit organization, they provide an identifier that can be used for anything, anywhere. It stays with the researcher though name and affiliation changes. Even PubMed has an Author – Identifier field that uses ORCiD iDs now.

How is ORCiD different from other profile systems like ResearchGate and LinkedIn?

ORCiD isn’t meant to replace any of these systems. It’s not a professional networking platform like Research Gate and LinkedIn. ORCiD does provide an online profile system where researchers can display their accomplishments… or not. The ORCiD iD itself is useful even if you never fill out the profile system.  Additionally, these platforms do not provide a unique identifier. In fact, ResearchGate includes a field for ORCiD iD!

How is ORCiD different from other unique IDs for research output like Web of Science Researcher ID and Scopus Author ID?

Researcher ID and Author ID are, as indicated by their names, are unique IDs for researchers. However, their limitation is that they only link to citations within their respective databases (Web of Science and Scopus). Thus, they do not capture the whole picture. ORCiD iDs are platform agnostic and can import data from your Researcher and Author IDs, so you don’t have to start from scratch.

What about Google Scholar Citation Profile?

Google Scholar Citations is designed for you to keep track of your publications and associated citation metrics. ORCiD doesn’t do these things, but Google Scholar does not create a unique identifier.

But I already have all these things set up. Can I import things from these places?

Yes! Here are a list of tutorials:

ORCiD has not formed partnerships with ResearchGate and LinkedIn to allow direct transfer of information. ResearchGate does have a field where you can input your ORCiD iD.

How do I register for an ORCiD iD?

Individuals can get an ORCiD iD for free.

ORCiD has institutional partners that can automate this process for their faculty based on information they have on file. CU Anschutz has access to CU Boulder’s ORCiD membership. If you have questions or comments about the possibility of CU Anschutz using ORCiD, please contact tobin.magle@ucdenver.edu.

  • Tobin Magle, PhD. Bioinformationist.

 

 

Bioinformatics Bites: MedGen

This bioinformatics bite is going to be a little but more clinically oriented:

A patient is presenting with excess blood clotting, which she thinks might be related to “something that runs in her family”. How do I find known diseases and genes (if any) that are associated with that phenotype?

A good place to start to look for information about symptoms and diseases that are related to genetics is MedGen. This database organizes information related to human medical genetics, like symptoms (clinical features), related genes, diseases, or genomic loci.

A perfectly reasonable approach would be to type “clotting” into the MedGen search box. Here’s what those results look like:

clinfeaturestag

There are 94 results, the first of which is a clotting disorder, but one that is associated with too little clotting rather than too much clotting. If you scroll down, you see records that are not actually diseases:

otherconcepts

To find out what type of record you’re looking at, look at the text after concept ID (blue boxes). The screen captures above show a Disease or Syndrome, a Finding, and a Pharmacologic substance. Notice that the diseases has links to other databases (green circle) and the others do not.

So how do we specify that we’re looking for a patient symptom related to a genetic disease? Like all the other NCBI databases, MedGen has field tags.

Here are some useful ones:

  • Clinical Features: short stature[clinical features] – records for diseases that are associated with short stature
  • Related Genes: LMNB1[gene] – diseases associated with this gene
  • Disease name: achrondroplasia[title] – this disease
  • Chromosome: 6[chromosome]- diseases associated with alterations to chromosome 6

Also, if you look back at the first screen shot, you can see a link that says “See MedGen results with clotting as a clinical feature (5)“. MedGen automatically sensed that clotting was a clinical feature, or symptom, and narrowed your results down for you.

Now we’ve narrowed the MedGen results to those that have clotting listed as a clinical feature. If you read the description, you see that Factor V deficiency is the only one associated with excess clotting. The record also shows what gene is associated with this disorder (F5) and links to descriptions from other resources like GeneReviews and OMIM, as well as Professional guidelines and Recent clinical studies.

result page.png

So how do you find out if this is in fact what your patient has? Find out next week!

-C. Tobin Magle, PhD, Biomedical Sciences Research Support Specialist