New History of Infant Feeding Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The Strauss Health Sciences Library is always rotating its exhibits and displays. This is the second of three new exhibits on the history of medicine, all of which can be found in the 2nd Floor Rotunda. Stop by and see them in-person or read more about Medicine Trade Cards and Dissection on the Library News Blog!


For most of history, there was no real alternative to breast feeding. The main reasons were the stigma of not breast feeding, and the lack of research on the subject. There was also no equipment available to artificially feed infants.

For the rich, the ability to hire a wet nurse allowed mothers the freedom to continue their regular lives. For the poor, however, a new baby would tie a mother to the home for years. Industrialization, beginning in the mid-19th century, forced a change in the way infants were raised.

Once women began to enter the work force, breast feeding became harder for working women, and alternatives needed to be found.

Located in the Second Floor rotunda on the South side of the Strauss Health Sciences Library.


This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

New Medicine Trade Cards Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The Strauss Health Sciences Library is always rotating its exhibits and displays. This is the second of three new exhibits on the history of medicine, all of which can be found in the 2nd Floor Rotunda. Check back next week for more information on the third exhibit!


Before the Food and Drug Administration, which was created in 1906, was given the mandate to rigorously regulate drugs, and the wild claims of medicine makers, “patent,” better described as proprietary, medicines could be found in every pharmacy and medicine show in the United States.  

One of the major elements of proprietary medicine in the United States was the trademarks on labels, letter fonts, and imagery on their products.

Hand in hand with selling their “miracle cures” in drugstores and traveling medicine shows, patent medicine makers used advertising in any form they could. One of the methods were trade cards.

Trade cards were small print ads given out at pharmacies that were very colorful, and often used imagery of women, children, and domestic life.

This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

New Dissection Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The use of human cadaveric dissection became a tool for teaching anatomy at the University of Montpellier in 1350, and became a fully sanctioned and regular part of anatomy education at the University of Paris in 1407.

By the mid-1800s, dissection to teach anatomy was key to medical education. Although there are several other ways to study anatomy, from books to virtual reality, research shows that dissection is invaluable.

Besides the anatomical knowledge gained, it is important in training empathetic physicians.

Located in the Second Floor rotunda on the South side of the Strauss Health Sciences Library.

This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

Luminosity in Shape and Form

Luminosity in Shape and Form

Artists Christine Hillhouse and Joanna Hillhouse

On Display October 7 – November 30, 2019

Reception November 2nd 1:30 – 4:30 PM (updated time)

Strauss Health Sciences Library Gallery

This was written by Debra, you can contact AskUs with questions.

Witness to the Holocaust Photographs Added to Mountain Scholar

The photographs of the Witness to the Holocaust sculptures by Devorah Sperber are now included in the CU Anschutz digital repository, Mountain Scholar.

The sculptures were installed in April of this year, and on April 30 the library had the Dedication and Conversation with the Artist. We added some of the photos from the event to the repository, to record the dedication for our history.

Our director, Melissa Desantis, provided descriptions of the individuals in the photos. You can see the descriptions if you click on the ‘View full record’ link for any of the images in the collection.

You can see all the photos of the sculptures, photos from the event, the flyer for the dedication, as well as the flyer that is now posted by the sculptures for people to take, in the repository.

This was written by Jessica Gerber, you can contact jessica.gerber@ucdenver.edu or AskUs with questions.