PubMed Changes are Coming

November Updates

A bit behind schedule but finally here, you can now find the new PubMed interface from the current PubMed browser.

Find the new PubMed interface

The new interface was built using modern web standards with a responsive layout, so it works more effectively on cell phones and tablets.

The updated Best Match sort uses a machine learning algorithm to elevate the most relevant articles to the top of your results list.

Starting in Spring 2020, this new interface will be the default for all PubMed users.

Read more about the changes to the interface from the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Have questions or feedback about the new PubMed interface? Contact NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback.

This was written by Christi Piper, you can contact AskUs with questions.

September Updates

The new PubMed is going live this month! Are you ready?

We will use this space to keep you updated on the changes that occurring and provide tips and tricks for using the new interface. You can interact with the beta version of the new PubMed by visiting PubMed Labs. As you use the new interface, please provide NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback as they will continue to make improvements to the interface until it becomes the default in January 2020.

Keep in mind that the beta interface is not currently a replacement for the current version of PubMed since it is not the complete database in regards to content or functionality yet.

Here are the most recent features that have been added to the new PubMed interface:

  • Filters have been added to narrow results by article type, text availability, publication date, species, language, sex, subject, journal category and age.
  • The Health Sciences Article Linker has been added! You can now get to our library holdings from the beta PubMed version.

Keep an eye on the library homepage for information about the new PubMed and quick links to access the site.

This was written by Kristin, you can contact AskUs with questions.

July Updates

In Fall/Winter 2019, PubMed will be undergoing some changes to the interface. If you want to see some of the changes that are coming before the current version of PubMed is replaced, you can visit PubMed Labs, the experimental platform that has some of the major updates already available.

Wondering what’s new? Here are some of the updated features:

Enhanced Search Results

The new version of PubMed (currently PubMed Labs) will have an enhanced relevant sort option, named Best Match, that ranks search results according to several relevance signals, including an article’s popularity, its publication date and type, and its query-document relevant score.

The search results page will now automatically include highlighted text fragments from the article abstract that are selected based on relevance to the search.

Responsive Design

Have you ever tried to use PubMed on your phone or tablet? The current version doesn’t work very well, but the new version of PubMed will feature a mobile-first responsive layout that offers better support for smaller device screens. The new interface will be compatible with any screen size no matter how you access PubMed.

Want to learn more about the new PubMed interface/PubMed Labs? Visit the NLM Technical Bulletin , where this information was taken from, for more details.

Have questions or feedback about the new PubMed interface? Contact NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback.

This was written by Christi Piper, you can contact AskUs with questions.

Welcome to Sam Kennefick and Ellie Svoboda!

In June, we had 2 new Graduate Assistants join the Education and Reference Department. Read more about them below and say hi next time you’re on AskUs!

Sam Kennefick is a Graduate Student Intern in the Education and Reference Department. She will be helping to answer reference questions via AskUs!, teaching courses, and working on fun projects here at the library. Sam attends San Jose State’s online MLIS program and is very excited to start her new library career! Prior to working at Strauss Health Sciences Library, Sam taught science at the K-12 level for four years. When not working or attending school, you’ll find Sam hiking with her dog, Nala, traveling, and rock climbing with her partner.

What is your position title and what is your interest in libraries?

I am the Open Educational Resources Graduate Assistant. I love that libraries are dedicated to connecting people to information and are welcoming spaces for everyone.

What do you like most about it so far?

I’m enjoying learning how to search for things efficiently. It is also exciting to be a part of the OER initiatives on the Anschutz campus and exploring the amazing resources that are freely available to the public.

What is your educational background?

I have bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Denver and an MFA in Creative Writing from Goddard College in Vermont. I will be pursuing my MLIS at the University of Denver starting this September.

What are some other jobs you have had?

For the last seven years I have taught high school students at Compass Montessori. I taught subjects as diverse as math, English, film, college prep, play writing, screenwriting, and theatre.

What’s an interesting tidbit that you would like others to know about you?

My last name means freedom in Czech as well as several other Slavic languages.

How do you spend your free time?

I enjoy baking and cooking and throwing dinner parties. I am a movie buff and watch around 100 films per year. I also spend my time hiking, running, reading, and playing trivia.

What do you hope to gain from working at HSL?

I hope to gain confidence in my reference abilities as well as a good understanding of how to share OER with diverse student bodies.

This was written by Christi Piper, you can contact AskUs with questions.

Resources for Negotiating a Physician Salary

Do you have questions about negotiating your salary or if your compensation is commiserate with your peers?

Take some of the guesswork out of  negotiations with some data from recent salary surveys.

AAMC Faculty Salaries

Visit the Library’s Service Desk to ask for the the 2019 AAMC Faculty Salary Report  or the 2016 AAMC Report on Medical School Faculty Salaries. These publications report on salaries during FY18 and FY15 from surveys of medical faculty from over 140 accredited US medical schools.

Medscape Physician Compensation Reports

Another online source is the Medscape Physician Compensation Report. The report is free, but registration with the site is required to view the report. A general overview and specialty reports are available.  The 2019 report represents almost 20,000 physicians in more than 30 specialties providing salary information, number of hours worked, amount of time spent seeing patients, what they find most rewarding, and challenging about their jobs, and more.

Medscape also offers several other interesting annual reports on lifestyle, work satisfaction, and insurers.  See how you compare with peers on these professional issues.

Educate yourself to ask for and offer the most competitive compensation!

This was written by Christi Piper, you can contact AskUs with questions.

Librarians in Print at the Strauss Health Sciences Library

Congratulations to Education & Reference Librarians Ben Harnke, Kristen DeSanto, Christi Piper, Nina McHale, and Lilian Hoffecker, who just published a featured article in Doody’s Core Titles about the recent changes to the department’s professional literature search service. The article, “Developing a Database for a Literature Search Service at an Academic Health Sciences Library,” details the process taken to revise and improve the organization of the Strauss Health Sciences Library’s search service for systematic reviews, grant proposals, book chapters, and other large publication projects.

Furthermore, DeSanto had an additional publication selected as a featured article with DCT on her role as a Clinical Librarian assisting inpatient teams in clinical rounding. In “Answering Questions at the Point of Care,” she provides an overview of her role as a librarian during clinical rounds, including the professional knowledge she brings to the role and the technologies and resources she uses the most in this unique setting.

Check out both of these articles in the links above, and join us in congratulating their hard work!

EndNote X9 is Here!

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Installing X9

To download EndNote X9, visit the Office of Information Technology’s EndNote site license page. Access to this page will require a Passport login. Links to the installation files for both Windows and Mac versions of X9 are available here, along with the license key, which you’ll need to complete your installation.

Upgrading to X9

If you are upgrading from a previous version to X9, note that:

  • EndNote/Clarivate Analytics recommends that you uninstall previous versions of EndNote before installing a new version;
  • Uninstalling EndNote will not delete your library;
  • You should close all Microsoft applications (e.g., Word and Outlook) before EndNote will install;
  • If you are due to upgrade your Microsoft applications, do that before installing EndNote.

Upcoming EndNote Classes and Training

The Library’s Education and Reference Department offers EndNote install lab and basic training sessions. Find days and times that work with your schedule on our instruction calendar. Registration is required, and sessions fill up quickly, so reserve your spot today.

Need more hands-on help? If you have attended an EndNote training session, but need additional help with installing, using, or upgrading EndNote, schedule a 1-1 consultation for advanced help. You can bring your laptop to the library, or we make office calls on campus to help with setup and troubleshooting, too.

More Information

For more information, including details about what’s new in X9, visit our EndNote X9 help guide.