Clinical Corner: Medical Images are Just a Click Away

Clinical Corner

Looking for high-quality medical images from reputable sources? The Health Sciences Library subscribes to two resources that I find particularly helpful for finding images: VisualDx and Clinical Key.



VisualDx started as a dermatology resource and is now a medical image library containing over 32,000 images. For a given medical condition, VisualDx provides multiple images that vary according to age, location on the body, skin pigmentation, and other clinical features. In addition to images, you can also:

  • read a synopsis of the conditions
  • learn diagnostic pearls as well as pitfalls
  • see a list of associated medications if the condition can be drug-related
  • find out the latest evidence for therapeutic treatments
  • download the mobile app

Type in the name of a condition, or use the “Quick Start Differential Builder” on the home page.



Clinical Key can be used to access both electronic textbooks and journals, but it is also a good source of high-quality medical images. Type in the name of a condition and press enter, then look for the “Filter by” section on the left-hand side of the page. Click the check-box next to “Images.” From the results page, you can click on an image to view it in a larger size, or go to the source book or journal from where the picture came. All images have originated from either a book or journal.


Try out these resources today! If you have questions or would like to schedule a one-on-one consultation to learn more about these or other resources, contact me at the email address or phone number below. There are many other sources of high-quality medical images, and a list has been compiled by Health Sciences Library staff on a LibGuide titled Images and Media.


Kristen DeSanto, MSLS, MS, RD, AHIP      

Clinical Librarian • 303-724-2121

Clinical Corner: FREE Exam Prep Questions

Clinical Corner

Are you studying for the USMLE, shelf exams, board certification exams, or the NCLEX? Sign up for a Board Vitals account and get free access to extensive question banks that will help you prepare. You can find a link to Board Vitals on the library homepage, in the Top Resources column on the left side of the page, scrolling down until you get to the Students heading. Or use this direct link: Be sure to use your, or email address when you register for an account.

BoardVitals offers:

  • The highest quality questions with detailed explanations
  • High-yield, vetted questions listed up front in an effort to maximize study time
  • Constantly evolving cloud-based system that updates based on feedback
  • Ability for users to create customized practice tests and review advanced statistics to know strengths and weaknesses
  • Detailed, up-to-date explanations, with references and links to sources
  • Administrators can monitor performance to serve as a proactive remediation tool
  • Faculty can send customized exams to students or utilize questions in discussions

Here are some of the exams available, according to discipline:

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Clinical Corner: Mobile Apps for Healthcare Professionals and Students

Clinical Corner

Whether you’re new to the Anschutz Medical Campus or a seasoned veteran, you may not be aware of the number of healthcare-related mobile apps made available to you by the Health Sciences Library. Before you start purchasing apps with your own money, check out the list of those that are already provided for you. Start taking advantage of this free benefit today!

Take a look at some of the following popular apps:


DynaMed icon

DynaMed – quickly gain access to evidence-based summaries on medical conditions, drug reference, clinical practice guidelines, and medical equations and calculators.

Micromedex icon

Micromedex – high-quality drug information, including dosing and administration, contraindications and precautions, adverse effects, drug interactions, and a drug identification tool for identifying a drug based on description.

Natural Medicines icon

Natural Medicines Database – reputable, evidence-based information on herbal and natural products, including data on safety, effectiveness, and interactions with drugs, food, or other herbs.

UpToDate icon

UpToDate – summaries of medical conditions in an electronic textbook-style format, with CME/CE credit available.

VisualDx icon

VisualDx – database of images of dermatological conditions and radiographics, along with disease information summaries; look up images by disease name or create a differential based on your patient’s clinical features.



Kristen DeSanto, MSLS, MS, RD, AHIP      

Clinical Librarian • 303-724-2121

Supporting Clinical Care: An Institute in Evidence-Based Practice for Medical Librarians

In July, the library hosted the 9th-annual Supporting Clinical Care: An Institute in Evidence-Based Practice for Medical Librarians. This intensive three-day workshop was taught by ten medical librarians, including four from the Health Sciences Library. Originally hosted by Dartmouth College, this workshop has an excellent reputation among medical librarians, and the Health Sciences Library is honored to now have it at the Anschutz Medical Campus since 2014. Thirty medical librarians participated, representing nineteen states and one Canadian province.

Designed specifically for medical librarians, the learning objectives include identifying and explaining the concepts of evidence-based practice (EBP), recognizing different types of study design, creating answerable clinical questions, and using those questions to find the best evidence in the literature. Attendees leave the workshop with enhanced understanding of EBP concepts and strategies for providing EBP training and support to the health care professionals at their organizations. The workshop combines large group lectures with small group discussions and hands-on learning, using a case-based approach. With a 3:1 student-faculty ratio, attendees receive individual attention that can be lacking at larger workshops. To learn more about the institute, visit

— Kristen Desanto


Clinical Corner: IOM’s “Improving Diagnosis in Health Care”

Clinical Corner

On September 22, 2015, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a new report titled “Improving Diagnosis in Health Care.” This continues the series of reports that began in 1999, the first being “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System.”

The National Academies Press is currently offering a prepublication print copy for sale, or you can pre-order a paperback. But there are also several free options: you can read it online in HTML format, or download a copy in PDF format. To download a PDF you can either create a free MyNAP account or download it as a guest.


  • A new page will open. From there, select either Download Free PDF or Read Online (on the right-hand side of the page).


Kristen DeSanto, MSLS, MS, RD, AHIP

Clinical Librarian • 303-724-2121

Clinical Corner: Acute Care for Older Adults

Clinical Corner

Today’s Department of Medicine Grand Rounds featured an informative and entertaining presentation by Dr. Samir Sinha, from Toronto’s Mount Sinai and University Health Network Hospitals. Dr. Sinha, whose presentation was titled “Rethinking Traditional Models of Acute Care for Older Adults,” discussed how current healthcare delivery in Canada and the United States can negatively impact older adults. He presented the Acute Care for Elders (ACE) Strategy, employed at his hospital, as an alternative.

The following articles and resources, many of which were discussed by Dr. Sinha, are related to the topic of patient and system outcomes for older adults:

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Clinical Corner: Inpatient Glycemic Control

Clinical Corner

Today’s Internal Medicine Morbidity and Mortality Conference focused on a patient with type 1 diabetes who had difficulty with glycemic control during hospitalization. Here are several articles for background information:

  • Inpatient glycemic control: Best practice advice from the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians. Qaseem A, Chou R, Humphrey LL, Shekelle P; Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians. Am J Med Qual. 2014 Mar-Apr;29(2):95-8. PMID: 23709472. Full text (free to UCD-AMC affiliates).


  • Management of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients in non-critical care setting: An Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. Umpierrez GE, Hellman R, Korytkowski MT, Kosiborod M, Maynard GA, Montori VM, Seley JJ, Van den Berghe G; Endocrine Society. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Jan;97(1):16-38. PMID: 22223765. Full text (free to UCD-AMC affiliates).


  • Hospital management of hyperglycemia. Lleva RR, Inzucchi SE. Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2011 Apr;18(2):110-8. PMID: 21358407. Full text (free to UCD-AMC affiliates).


  • Intensive insulin therapy in hospitalized patients: A systematic review. Kansagara D, Fu R, Freeman M, Wolf F, Helfand M. Ann Intern Med. 2011 Feb 15;154(4):268-82. PMID: 21320942. Full text (free to UCD-AMC affiliates).


Three studies were presented at the end of conference as teaching points:

  • Patient communication during handovers between emergency medicine and internal medicine residents. Fischer M, Hemphill RR, Rimler E, Marshall S, Brownfield E, Shayne P, Di Francesco L, Santen SA. J Grad Med Educ. 2012 Dec;4(4):533-7. PMID: 24294436. Free full text.


  • Exploring emergency physician-hospitalist handoff interactions: Development of the Handoff Communication Assessment. Apker J, Mallak LA, Applegate EB 3rd, Gibson SC, Ham JJ, Johnson NA, Street RL Jr. Ann Emerg Med. 2010 Feb;55(2):161-70. PMID: 19944486. Full text (free to UCD-AMC affiliates).


  • Chart biopsy: An emerging medical practice enabled by electronic health records and its impacts on emergency department-inpatient admission handoffs. Hilligoss B, Zheng K. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2013 Mar-Apr;20(2):260-7. PMID: 22962194. Free full text.


Kristen DeSanto, MSLS, MS, RD, AHIP

Clinical Librarian • 303-724-2121