New Books List

Book Stacks
Behave : the biology of humans at our best and worst
Gerontological nursing : competencies for care

Bartecchi Southeast Asia Conflict Medical Collection
The face of mercy : a photographic history of medicine at war
Huế 1968 : a turning point of the American war in Vietnam
Medics in action
Pandemics and peace : public health cooperation in zones of conflict
War and the soul : healing our nation’s veterans from post-traumatic stress disorder
War in the blood : sex, politics, and AIDS in Southeast Asia
Wizard 6 : a combat psychiatrist in Vietnam
Wounded : Vietnam to Iraq
Wounds of war : the psychological aftermath of combat in Vietnam

Medical Humanities
You don’t look like anyone I know : a true story of family, face blindness, and forgiveness

Strauss-Wisneski Indigenous and Integrative Medicine
The health effects of cannabis and cannabinoids : the current state of evidence and recommendations for research

Welcome to Anschutz! Tips for New Students, Faculty, and Staff

Now that you’ve had a little time to settle in, purchase your textbooks, and figure out where you can get lunch, we want to extend a warm welcome from the faculty and staff at your Health Sciences Library here on campus! The Health Sciences Library website is the gateway for many resources you’ll use for your studies and research.

From our website, you can:

  • Access library resources (using your PassportID credentials if you’re off-campus)
  • Click the Ask Us! link to contact a librarian by phone, chat, or email for quick questions, customized one-on-one research consultation appointments, or anything else you may need help with
  • Review our Getting Started at the Library & Finding Full Text Online resource guide to learn essential skills for new library users (other tutorials and classes are available)
  • Use SearchHSL from the homepage to explore electronic books, journals, and other resources that contain information on your research topic
  • Register for “Getting Started At The Library” or sign up for other library classes for help with PubMed, EndNote, and other resources
  • Renew your library books online, and get copies of materials that CU does not own from a wide network of libraries using Interlibrary Loan
  • Find an electronic textbook to help you study and learn!

Although you can get to most Library resources without ever leaving your home, there are many reasons to visit the Library:

  • Access library resources from your laptop via the campus WiFi
  • Check out laptops with pre-loaded applications, art, and productivity tools for 5 days!
  • Use any of 48 computer workstations in the Information Commons, some with unique software like SPSS and SAS, VH Dissector Pro, and MS Office. One workstation is equipped with ZoomText for the visually impaired and four have document scanners
  • Get help locating evidence-based information, clinical care information, or primary source articles
  • Reserve one of our group study rooms  (majority of rooms are first-come-first-served).
  • You can connect your laptop to the flat-panel LCD screens to display a presentation or website, or use the mobile whiteboards to facilitate group study sessions (check out dry erase markers from the Service Desk)
  • Study or take a break outdoors on any one of several library patios. Wireless internet and electrical outlets are available on the patios
  • Reserve one of the library’s several meeting rooms for your group meeting of 12-50 participants

Especially for students:

 The Health Sciences Library offers many services specifically for students:

 Especially for Staff and Faculty!

If you have any questions at all, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We are here to help you! Best wishes on your new journey and we’ll look forward to seeing you in the library.

New authentication is here for HSL’s EZproxy/off campus access

We’ve changed the way you log in, using the single sign on mechanism offered by the CU’s Office of Information Technology. This method should be familiar to most as it’s the same single-sign on method that’s used at the UCDAccess portal.

https://proxy.hsl.ucdenver.edu

Questions? Feedback?  Feel free to contact us at this email: library.web@ucdenver.edu.

Search the World with Interlibrary Loan!

Eye_ILL_blogWhether you’re faculty, staff, or a student on the Anschutz Medical Campus, you’re going to find yourself doing a lot of research. And while the library has access to thousands of journals and books, it certainly doesn’t have everything that you may require. But don’t let that limit you! The Interlibrary Loan (ILL) Department can help you obtain the materials that you need!

If you’re an affiliated member of the AMC, the services provided by Interlibrary Loan (ILL) are free! Simply sign up for an ILLiad account and begin placing requests immediately for articles, books, theses, and other research materials. While ILL isn’t a guarantee, we will do what we can to fill your requests.

If you have any questions about the ILL service provided to faculty, staff, and students, or your eligibility, please do not hesitate to contact the ILL office at 303-724-2111 or at copydocs@ucdenver.edu.

[Brittany Heer, Interlibrary Loan Manager]

Phrenology – Mid 19th to early 20th century

From the 1840s to the 1920s, the popular medical movement of Phrenology took hold in the U.S. During this time phrenology was similar to pop-psychology. Phrenology was the pseudo-science that claimed to be able to identify a person’s character by the bumps on their skull. The ‘evidence’ was the belief that the brain was made up of 37 unique organs that each controlled a behavior or personality trait. Many practitioners of Phrenology, including most famously the Fowler family, believed that the organs could be exercised and a person could have a better and happier life. It also had contemporary critics and a sinister side.

The Health Science Library has several distinctive artifacts from the mid-19th to early 20th Century practice of Phrenology on exhibit. Please visit the second floor rotunda to experience the past of Phrenology.

Paul Andrews, MA
Collection Development

Featured book for June


Tell me everything you don’t remember

The stroke that changed my life

by Christine Hyung-Oak Lee

“Christine Hyung-Oak Lee woke up with a headache on the morning of December 31, 2006. By that afternoon, she saw the world–quite literally–upside down. By New Year’s Day, she was unable to form a coherent sentence. And after hours in the ER, days in the hospital, and multiple questions and tests, her doctors informed her that she had had a stroke.

For months afterward, Lee outsourced her memories to a journal, taking diligent notes to compensate for the thoughts she could no longer hold on to. It is from these notes that she has constructed this frank and compelling memoir. …

Lee illuminates the connection between memory and identity in an honest, meditative, and truly funny manner, utterly devoid of self-pity. And as she recovers, she begins to realize that this unexpected and devastating event has provided a catalyst for coming to terms with her true self–and, in a way, has allowed her to become the person she’s always wanted to be.”

Medical Humanities/3rd floor Special Collections
WL 356 L477t 2017

New databases: Social Sciences with Full Text and Environment Complete

The library has access to two new databases: Social Sciences with Full Text and Environment Complete. You can find them listed on our databases page or in SearchHSL.

  • Social Sciences Full Text provides sources covering a wide array of subjects, including addiction studies, ethics, public welfare, urban studies and more.
  • Environment Complete covers agriculture, ecosystem ecology, energy, and affiliated areas of study.