FY20 Library Subscriptions Survey Report

Thanks to all of you who participated in the FY20 Library Subscriptions Survey!  The survey ran from November 21 through December 12, 2019.  Here is our first post about the survey results.  Please watch for more posts addressing specific questions or issues we saw from the survey.

Demographics

There were 630 total responses to the survey.  Responders represented all six Schools and College, campus administration & support units, UCHealth, and others. 

Here is the distribution of survey respondents by their university status:

Subscription Changes

The Strauss Health Sciences Library has an overall collections budget of nearly $3 million.  Less than 1% of the collection budget is spent on one-time purchases while 99% is spent on electronic annual subscriptions. Every year our subscription costs rise approximately 5-7%.  In FY20, the library has a shortfall in our collections budget of $300,000 and needs to make some difficult decisions in cancellations.

Based on pricing, usage, and feedback received from this survey, the library renewed most of the subscriptions listed on the survey.  However, we made the following decisions:

Cancellations:

Resources that received less than 4% of responses rating them “Essential” or “Important” were examined further.  After review, the following subscriptions were cancelled.

American Physical Society journals (3.6% of respondents rated it as essential or important)

Knovel (1.5%of respondents rated it as essential or important)

VisualDx (3.8% of respondents rated it as essential or important)

Package Adjustments:

In 2020, the library switched the American Chemical Society (ACS) journal subscription package to a smaller package, retaining the top 15 most used journals.  All ACS titles remain available via interlibrary loan at no cost to faculty, students and staff.

Please see more information about our collection budget and subscription changes here:

https://library.cuanschutz.edu/library-collections-budget

If you have any questions or comments about this survey and survey results, please contact Yumin Jiang, Head of Collection Management, at: 303-724-2137, yumin.jiang@cuanschutz.edu

Rare Book Profile: R.V. Pierce’s The People’s Common Sense Medical Adviser in Plain English, or, Medicine Simplified.

PierceTPcropR.V. Pierce’s The People’s Common Sense Medical Adviser (Buffalo, N.Y.: World’s Dispensary-Printing Office and Bindery, 1875), is a household medicine and health guide, as well as an advertisement for its author and publisher’s products and services. First published in 1875, it remained in print through the 100th edition of 1935, sold millions of copies, and helped make its author one of the most successful manufacturer of home remedies in the late 19th century.

Ray Vaughn Pierce (1840-1914) was an American physician, pharmaceutical entrepreneur, author, publisher, and politician. Pierce was born and raised in Stark, New York. He was a school teacher briefly, then left to attend the Eclectic Medical College in Cincinnati, Ohio. After receiving his medical degree in 1862, he established a medical practice in Titusville, Pennsylvania. In 1867, he moved to Buffalo, New York, where he began manufacturing patent medicines and selling them by mail-order. To house his thriving manufacturing and mail-order operations, Pierce built the World’s Dispensary Building. In 1878, Pierce built Pierce’s Palace Hotel nearby to accommodate his many mail-order customers who came to Buffalo seeking his services as a physician. Pierce’s Palace Hotel burned down in 1881 and Pierce replaced it with the Invalids Hotel and Surgical Institute. His enterprise continued to expand, and at one point had an office in London, England. In 1883 Pierce consolidated all of his business ventures as TheWorld’s Dispensary Medical Association, which was later renamed Pierce’s Proprietaries. Pierce’s son, Dr. Valentine Mott Pierce, succeeded his father as head of the business through the 1940s.

In 1877, Pierce launched his political career, serving in the New York State Senate from 1877-1879, and in the U.S. House of Representatives for the 32nd Congressional District of New York as a Republican from March 4, 1879 until his resignation on September 18, 1880, due to ill health. He never held an elected office again, although he was an active opponent of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. In the last year of his life, Pierce retired to his winter home in St. Vincent, Florida, where he died on February 4, 1914.

Pierce was a master of marketing, using print media and signs to spread advertisements and testimonials for his products and services throughout the country. Not all publications were complimentary, and some, such as Colliers and Ladies Home Journal were extremely critical of his products. Pierce won his lawsuit against Ladies Home Journal, but his suit against Colliers was dismissed due to varying definitions of the word “quack.”

The People’s Common Sense Medical Adviser is arranged in four main parts. The first, Physiology, is laid out like a textbook, containing a general overview of basic biology, human and animal, and the various systems of the body, including current theories of race, intelligence, and the relationship between physiognomy and character, with chapters on marriage and reproduction. The second part, Hygiene, covers various aspects of daily life, with recommendations for clean living and criticism of practices and theories with which Pierce disagreed. It also includes a section on diet, with recipes. The third section, Rational Medicine, consists of brief summaries of the various systems of medicine in vogue at the time, such as homoeopathy and hydropathy, a list of individual herbal and compounded preparations available for sale from The World’s Dispensary, and a list of the therapeutic value of various types of bath. The final and largest section, Diseases and Their Remedial Treatment, comprises over half the book, consisting mainly of list of disorders, with a description of the disorder, various possible treatments, cases, and glowing testimonials for the products and services of The World’s Dispensary. It ends with a section describing The World’s Dispensary and its services, how to arrange a visit, and how to submit a specimen for diagnosis by mail.

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The Strauss Health Sciences Library’s copy of the first edition of The people’s common sense medical adviser is bound in green publisher’s cloth with blind-stamped boards and gilt-stamped spine. The plates have unprinted tissue guards sheets. It was given to the Health Sciences Library by G. Murray Edwards, M.D. The library also has the second edition (1876), the twentieth edition (1889), and the fortieth edition (1895).

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@cuanschutz.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

 

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This was written by Emily, you can contact AskUs with questions.

New History of Infant Feeding Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The Strauss Health Sciences Library is always rotating its exhibits and displays. This is the second of three new exhibits on the history of medicine, all of which can be found in the 2nd Floor Rotunda. Stop by and see them in-person or read more about Medicine Trade Cards and Dissection on the Library News Blog!


For most of history, there was no real alternative to breast feeding. The main reasons were the stigma of not breast feeding, and the lack of research on the subject. There was also no equipment available to artificially feed infants.

For the rich, the ability to hire a wet nurse allowed mothers the freedom to continue their regular lives. For the poor, however, a new baby would tie a mother to the home for years. Industrialization, beginning in the mid-19th century, forced a change in the way infants were raised.

Once women began to enter the work force, breast feeding became harder for working women, and alternatives needed to be found.

Located in the Second Floor rotunda on the South side of the Strauss Health Sciences Library.


This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

New Medicine Trade Cards Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The Strauss Health Sciences Library is always rotating its exhibits and displays. This is the second of three new exhibits on the history of medicine, all of which can be found in the 2nd Floor Rotunda. Check back next week for more information on the third exhibit!


Before the Food and Drug Administration, which was created in 1906, was given the mandate to rigorously regulate drugs, and the wild claims of medicine makers, “patent,” better described as proprietary, medicines could be found in every pharmacy and medicine show in the United States.  

One of the major elements of proprietary medicine in the United States was the trademarks on labels, letter fonts, and imagery on their products.

Hand in hand with selling their “miracle cures” in drugstores and traveling medicine shows, patent medicine makers used advertising in any form they could. One of the methods were trade cards.

Trade cards were small print ads given out at pharmacies that were very colorful, and often used imagery of women, children, and domestic life.

This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

New Dissection Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

The use of human cadaveric dissection became a tool for teaching anatomy at the University of Montpellier in 1350, and became a fully sanctioned and regular part of anatomy education at the University of Paris in 1407.

By the mid-1800s, dissection to teach anatomy was key to medical education. Although there are several other ways to study anatomy, from books to virtual reality, research shows that dissection is invaluable.

Besides the anatomical knowledge gained, it is important in training empathetic physicians.

Located in the Second Floor rotunda on the South side of the Strauss Health Sciences Library.

This was written by Paul Andrews. You can contact AskUs with any questions.

FY20 Library Subscriptions Survey

Due to budget constraints and the increasing cost of library resources, the Strauss Health Sciences Library is seeking feedback on the usefulness and importance of selected resources (journal packages, databases, etc.) via a Qualtrics survey:

https://ucdenver.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_a8Eo968STbkRMWh

This survey is password protected.  You may find the password in the Nov. 21 Academic Announcements email titled “FY20 Library Subscriptions Survey”, or you can email AskUs (askus@hsl.ucdenver.libanswers.com) to get the password.

This seven-question survey should take about 10-15 minutes to complete. Please respond to the survey by Thursday, December 12th.

Questions or comments about this survey or any library resource can be sent to Yumin Jiang, Head of Collection Management. She can be reached at yumin.jiang@cuanschutz.edu or (303) 724-2137.

This was written by Yumin, you can contact AskUs with questions.

PubMed Changes are Coming

November Updates

A bit behind schedule but finally here, you can now find the new PubMed interface from the current PubMed browser.

Find the new PubMed interface

The new interface was built using modern web standards with a responsive layout, so it works more effectively on cell phones and tablets.

The updated Best Match sort uses a machine learning algorithm to elevate the most relevant articles to the top of your results list.

Starting in Spring 2020, this new interface will be the default for all PubMed users.

Read more about the changes to the interface from the NLM Technical Bulletin.

Have questions or feedback about the new PubMed interface? Contact NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback.

This was written by Christi Piper, you can contact AskUs with questions.

September Updates

The new PubMed is going live this month! Are you ready?

We will use this space to keep you updated on the changes that occurring and provide tips and tricks for using the new interface. You can interact with the beta version of the new PubMed by visiting PubMed Labs. As you use the new interface, please provide NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback as they will continue to make improvements to the interface until it becomes the default in January 2020.

Keep in mind that the beta interface is not currently a replacement for the current version of PubMed since it is not the complete database in regards to content or functionality yet.

Here are the most recent features that have been added to the new PubMed interface:

  • Filters have been added to narrow results by article type, text availability, publication date, species, language, sex, subject, journal category and age.
  • The Health Sciences Article Linker has been added! You can now get to our library holdings from the beta PubMed version.

Keep an eye on the library homepage for information about the new PubMed and quick links to access the site.

This was written by Ellie, you can contact AskUs with questions.

July Updates

In Fall/Winter 2019, PubMed will be undergoing some changes to the interface. If you want to see some of the changes that are coming before the current version of PubMed is replaced, you can visit PubMed Labs, the experimental platform that has some of the major updates already available.

Wondering what’s new? Here are some of the updated features:

Enhanced Search Results

The new version of PubMed (currently PubMed Labs) will have an enhanced relevant sort option, named Best Match, that ranks search results according to several relevance signals, including an article’s popularity, its publication date and type, and its query-document relevant score.

The search results page will now automatically include highlighted text fragments from the article abstract that are selected based on relevance to the search.

Responsive Design

Have you ever tried to use PubMed on your phone or tablet? The current version doesn’t work very well, but the new version of PubMed will feature a mobile-first responsive layout that offers better support for smaller device screens. The new interface will be compatible with any screen size no matter how you access PubMed.

Want to learn more about the new PubMed interface/PubMed Labs? Visit the NLM Technical Bulletin , where this information was taken from, for more details.

Have questions or feedback about the new PubMed interface? Contact NLM with your PubMed Labs Feedback.

This was written by Christi Piper, you can contact AskUs with questions.