Welcome to Anschutz! Tips for New Students, Faculty, and Staff

Now that you’ve had a little time to settle in, purchase your textbooks, and figure out where you can get lunch, we want to extend a warm welcome from the faculty and staff at your Health Sciences Library here on campus! The Health Sciences Library website is the gateway for many resources you’ll use for your studies and research.

From our website, you can:

  • Access library resources (using your PassportID credentials if you’re off-campus)
  • Click the Ask Us! link to contact a librarian by phone, chat, or email for quick questions, customized one-on-one research consultation appointments, or anything else you may need help with
  • Review our Getting Started at the Library & Finding Full Text Online resource guide to learn essential skills for new library users (other tutorials and classes are available)
  • Use SearchHSL from the homepage to explore electronic books, journals, and other resources that contain information on your research topic
  • Register for “Getting Started At The Library” or sign up for other library classes for help with PubMed, EndNote, and other resources
  • Renew your library books online, and get copies of materials that CU does not own from a wide network of libraries using Interlibrary Loan
  • Find an electronic textbook to help you study and learn!

Although you can get to most Library resources without ever leaving your home, there are many reasons to visit the Library:

  • Access library resources from your laptop via the campus WiFi
  • Check out laptops with pre-loaded applications, art, and productivity tools for 5 days!
  • Use any of 48 computer workstations in the Information Commons, some with unique software like SPSS and SAS, VH Dissector Pro, and MS Office. One workstation is equipped with ZoomText for the visually impaired and four have document scanners
  • Get help locating evidence-based information, clinical care information, or primary source articles
  • Reserve one of our group study rooms  (majority of rooms are first-come-first-served).
  • You can connect your laptop to the flat-panel LCD screens to display a presentation or website, or use the mobile whiteboards to facilitate group study sessions (check out dry erase markers from the Service Desk)
  • Study or take a break outdoors on any one of several library patios. Wireless internet and electrical outlets are available on the patios
  • Reserve one of the library’s several meeting rooms for your group meeting of 12-50 participants

Especially for students:

 The Health Sciences Library offers many services specifically for students:

 Especially for Staff and Faculty!

If you have any questions at all, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We are here to help you! Best wishes on your new journey and we’ll look forward to seeing you in the library.

Leaving Anschutz Medical Campus? Suggestions for a smooth transition

This time each year, students, residents, fellows, and faculty prepare to leave the Anschutz Medical Campus to pursue careers elsewhere – an exciting (and occasionally overwhelming) prospect! After you have left the Anschutz campus you will no longer have access to our library’s resources, so we have compiled the following suggestions to help you transition your research and resources to your new institution.

Find out if you will have access to a library with your new affiliation.

If you will be affiliated with a hospital, health system, or academic institution, you should have access to a library or information center. Check the institution’s website or contact administrators to find out about library services. Don’t hesitate to contact the health sciences librarian at your new institution. He or she will be a valuable source of information about your new organization as well as clinical and research information.

Evaluate clinical point-of-care resources.

If you will be affiliated with an institution that does not provide access to clinical point-of-care resources, you may opt to purchase a personal subscription to one of these resources. Evaluate clinical resources offered by the Health Sciences Library before you leave. Current individual subscription prices for some of these products are provided below.

A doctor looks at books in a library.

By Scome-squ. [CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons]

Use Loansome Doc to obtain copies of journal articles.

If you are entering private practice or joining an organization without a library, consider opening a Loansome Doc account to obtain copies of journal articles (usually for a fee) from a hospital or academic medical library in your area. To find out about your options for document delivery and other support services, contact the National Network of Libraries of Medicine at 1-800-338-7657. If you are joining an institution with a library, you should be able to obtain articles using their Interlibrary Loan program.

Email your Ovid search strategies.

If you will have access to Ovid databases at your new institution, you may want to email your saved searches to yourself before your Ovid account with the Health Sciences Library expires. You can then recreate your searches in your new Ovid account. If you’d like help from a librarian at the Anschutz Health Sciences Library, AskUs! for assistance.

Get help setting up PubMed search queries.

Many of you will use the freely-available PubMed to search MEDLINE. PubMed allows you to save searches and receive regular updates on current research in your field. To learn how to set up a My NCBI account to save searches in PubMed, visit the My NCBI web page. Again, if you’d like a hand doing this, AskUs! for help.

Check out local libraries in your new location.

Visit the public library in your new location and ask about resources. Even libraries in small towns may offer access to major medical and science journals. Libraries at public colleges and universities sometimes offer services to local communities so if you will be located near a public college or university, explore the options they provide.

Find and download smartphone apps that will help you locate information quickly.

While many apps are linked to subscription-based products, some great apps are free or very inexpensive.

  • Epocrates: Drug, disease, and diagnostic information. Free. Android or iOS
  • National Library of Medicine apps: Free.
  • Skyscape: Drug information and calculators. Free.
  • UMEM Pearls: Evidence based educational pearls by UMD faculty members. Free. Android or iOS
  • Point of Care apps: CME on a variety of topics. Most are free. iOS only; web platform available as well.
  • Read by QxMD: A platform to help you keep on top of new medical and scientific research. Searches PubMed and provides topic reviews as well. Free.
  • Calculate by QxMD: Clinical calculators and decision support tools for healthcare providers. Free.
  • Micromedex series: Drug calculators, interactions, and more. Most are free.
  • Medscape: Medical news and calculators, drug information & tools, disease information, etc. Free.

A close-up photo of a surgeon's face as he operates.

By Phallinn Ooi. [CC BY 2.0 via Flickr]

Take advantage of resources that are free or available with professional memberships.

The benefits of membership in professional societies usually include access to the society’s publications. (For example, membership in the American College of Physicians includes access to ACP Smart Medicine.) There are also many resources that are available for free – a selection of these is below.

  • BioMed Central: 150+ peer-reviewed open access health sciences journals.
  • Directory of Open Access Journals: 4,100+ open access journals in all subjects including dentistry, medicine, nursing, and public health.
  • Disease Management Project: Online medical textbook from the Cleveland Clinic.
  • FreeBooks4Doctors:  360+ medical textbooks arranged by specialty.
  • Free Medical Journals: 4000+ medical/health journals.
  • Guideline Index: 2,500+ summaries for various diseases and conditions from the National Guideline Clearinghouse.
  • HighWire Press Free Online Full-Text Articles: a massive archive of full-text articles on a variety of topics including medicine. Some are free, some require payment.
  • Medscape: Healthcare information from various medical publishers (registration is required).
  • Medscape Reference: Directory of information on more than 7,000 diseases and disorders, including images and multimedia content.
  • MerckMedicus: Medical news, online learning resources, and diagnostic tools (registration is required).
  • NCBI Bookshelf: A collection of online biomedical books from the National Library of Medicine.
  • PLoS Journals: Open access, peer-reviewed journals on a variety of topics published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS).
  • PMC (PubMed Central): A free full-text archive of nearly 4 million biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the National Library of Medicine.
  • RxList, The Internet Drug Index: An easy-to-search database of information about prescription medications. It includes a drug identification image database.

The faculty and staff of the Health Sciences Library wish you the very best of luck as you move on to exciting new endeavors. We are here to help you make a smooth transition!

If we can be of any assistance as you plan your departure, please contact us — AskUs! or call us at (303) 724-2152.

Getting full text through Google Scholar

Google Scholar is a great resource for a lot of things — however, at first glance, it might not seem like it’s very easy to get access to the full text of most articles.

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But did you know that you can have Google Scholar provide you with the same Article Linker button that you click to access full text in other databases like PubMed? Which means you can easily access all of our subscription articles — right from Google Scholar?!

It’s super easy. You just have to turn this function on. (It’s best if you’re signed into your Google account in your web browser, so that your browser remembers this setting every time you open it. Cookies must also be enabled on your browser in order for this to work.)

Go to scholar.google.com. Click the “settings” button at the top of the page.

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Click the “library links” button.

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Type “anschutz” into the search bar, then click the search button. Our library should come up. Click the checkbox, and then click save. (Leave the “WorldCat” option checked too).

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That’s it! You’re done! Now when you search in Google Scholar, the results page should look like this:

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You can click those “Full Text @ CU Anschutz” buttons to check and see if we have a subscription that gives us access to the full text of the article. When you’re off campus and you click those buttons, you should be prompted to log in using your CU Anschutz (PassportID) credentials in order to access full text.

If we don’t have an article you want, feel free to request it through Interlibrary Loan.

Remember, if you’re having trouble, please don’t hesitate to ask us for help!

 

A visit to the National Library of Medicine

Back in September, I had the opportunity to visit the National Library of Medicine and take their public tour of the facility. I’ll start by saying it’s a really interesting tour, so if you’re ever in the Washington D.C. area, you should definitely check it out!

The NLM is located in Bethesda, Maryland (about 30 minutes outside of D.C.), on the campus of the National Institutes of Health. It was founded in 1836 and is currently the world’s largest biomedical library. The NLM also coordinates the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, of which your Health Sciences Library is a member.

The NLM building itself is very nice, with a couple of reading rooms on the ground floor and a lobby area that houses temporary exhibitions. During the public tour, we learned a bit about the history of the NLM and the building, and got to see a few different rooms and departments.

Coincidentally, myself and the other two guests on the tour I took were all librarians, so we saw a couple of areas that I believe the tour usually doesn’t go to. We were able to go downstairs into the stacks area, where there are bound physical copies of every biomedical journal you can imagine, dating back many decades. If the internet ever ceases to exist, the NLM will still have all the journal articles you might need! Interestingly, the design of the building initially included several architectural measures to keep these journals safe in the event of a catastrophic event in the area, but due to a variety of complications and bureaucratic red tape, the items are not actually protected by the design as it was intended.

We also saw several rooms full of massive servers that house MeSH, and the rooms where staff members work on MeSH. If you don’t know, MeSH stands for Medical Subject Headings. It is a controlled vocabulary and is what makes PubMed (which is handled by the NLM) unique. NLM staff members with significant experience in a particular medical area–rather than robots–read every single article that will end up in PubMed. These humans then assign MeSH terms to each article. This process ensures that if I write an article about “lung cancer” and you write an article about “pulmonary neoplasms”, we’ll find each others’ articles even if we don’t specifically search for all of those terms– this makes PubMed an incredibly valuable resource for research, as I’m sure you know! (If you want to know more about using MeSH to your advantage to search PubMed really effectively, contact the Health Sciences Library and we’ll help you out.) Anyway, it was very neat to see the spaces where MeSH “lives” in the NLM building.

The real highlight of the tour for me was the History of Medicine collection, which is housed in one of the reading rooms on the ground floor. We got to take a peek in some staff members’ offices that are in this area, and saw this very large and very expensive book scanner that the staff members use to digitize historical texts. Out in the reading room area, we saw this very old card catalog that is not in use anymore but is still in its original location.

Finally, we went into a very fancy climate-controlled room where all of the really valuable historical texts are kept. This was incredible to see. This room has all kinds of security and preservation measures to keep these materials safe. To be honest, I can’t remember most of the specific texts that the staff member pulled out for us because they all so old and so amazing, but I do recall that he showed us an original letter that George Washington wrote to a medical officer during the Revolutionary War!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I didn’t get great pictures of the books, but the short slideshow above gives you an idea of the kinds of materials in this room. Very, very cool!

The tour ended there, but you can see some of the amazing things the National Library of Medicine has from your own living room — their Digital Projects webpage is a good place to start your exploration of some materials you wouldn’t expect to be able to see on the web, such as an Egyptian surgical papyrus written in 1600 BC, or anatomical drawings from the 1400s! (Check out Historical Anatomies on the Web and Turning the Pages to see those documents.) The NLM also has a pretty thorough digitized collection of historical health-related images and videos, located on their Digital Collections webpage.

However, aside from all of the amazing old things, the NLM is also home to a massive number of current and modern resources that can improve your research and practice. I won’t go into detail here, but if you want to know more, please contact us at 303-724-2152 or AskUs@hsl.ucdenver.libanswers.com. Thanks for reading, and be sure to go visit the National Library of Medicine if you ever get the chance!

Copyright & Fair Use: Distinguishing Fact from Fiction

Copyright and Fair Use laws can be difficult to navigate. Come and explore these concepts with us! We’ll be hosting seminars on the topic over the next few months.

In each class, we’ll review some typical scenarios that educators and researchers might encounter and talk about how you can determine if your use of the material falls under Fair Use. We’ll look at situations like:

  • Sharing copies of articles for journal clubs or institutional review with non-affiliated participants
  • Uploading vs. linking of journal articles in Canvas for classes
  • Researchers reusing the Methods section from one to the next article
  • Uploading book chapters into class management systems
  • Any copyright or fair use situations you may have encountered in your work

We’ll work together to determine the differences between Copyright and Fair Use, recognize what constitutes Educational Use, learn to identify situations that may violate Copyright, and understand how to conduct a quick and easy Fair Use evaluation.

How do you make a good faith effort to consider copyright, fair use, and your liability? Come join us, and let’s make Copyright and Fair Use easy.

Seminar will be offered on the following days (click the link to register!):
Thursday, March 17, 12-1pm
Thursday, April 7, 12-1pm

Questions or comments? Contact john.jones@ucdenver.edu

Hope to see you there!

 

 

 

Leaving Anschutz Medical Campus? Suggestions for a smooth transition

This time each year, students, residents, fellows, and faculty prepare to leave the Anschutz Medical Campus to pursue careers elsewhere – an exciting (and occasionally overwhelming) prospect! After you have left the Anschutz campus you will no longer have access to our library’s resources, so we have compiled the following suggestions to help you transition your research and resources to your new institution.

Find out if you will have access to a library with your new affiliation.

If you will be affiliated with a hospital, health system, or academic institution, you should have access to a library or information center. Check the institution’s website or contact administrators to find out about library services. Don’t hesitate to contact the health sciences librarian at your new institution. He or she will be a valuable source of information about your new organization as well as clinical and research information.

Evaluate clinical point-of-care resources.

If you will be affiliated with an institution that does not provide access to clinical point-of-care resources, you may opt to purchase a personal subscription to one of these resources. Evaluate clinical resources offered by the Health Sciences Library before you leave. Current individual subscription prices for some of these products are provided below.

A doctor looks at books in a library.

By Scome-squ. [CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons]

Use Loansome Doc to obtain copies of journal articles.

If you are entering private practice or joining an organization without a library, consider opening a Loansome Doc account to obtain copies of journal articles (usually for a fee) from a hospital or academic medical library in your area. To find out about your options for document delivery and other support services, contact the National Network of Libraries of Medicine at 1-800-338-7657.

Email your Ovid search strategies.

If you will have access to Ovid databases at your new institution, you may want to email your saved searches to yourself before your Ovid account with the Health Sciences Library expires. You can then recreate your searches in your new Ovid account. If you’d like help from a librarian at the Anschutz Health Sciences Library, AskUs! for assistance.

Get help setting up PubMed search queries.

Many of you will use the freely available PubMed to search MEDLINE. PubMed allows you to save searches and receive regular updates on current research in your field. To learn how to set up a My NCBI account to save searches in PubMed, visit the My NCBI web page. Again, if you’d like a hand doing this, AskUs! for help.

Check out local libraries in your new location.

Visit the public library in your new location and ask about resources. Even libraries in small towns may offer access to major medical and science journals. Libraries at public colleges and universities sometimes offer services to local communities so if you will be located near a public college or university, explore the options they provide.

Find and load smartphone apps that will help you locate information quickly.

While many apps are linked to subscription-based products, some great apps are free or very inexpensive.

  • Epocrates: Drug, disease, and diagnostic information. Free. Android or iOS
  • National Library of Medicine apps: Free.
  • Skyscape: Drug information and calculators. Free.
  • Mediquation: Comprehensive medical calculator. $4.99
  • UMEM Pearls: Evidence based educational pearls by UMD faculty members. Free. Android or iOS
  • Point of Care apps: CME on a variety of topics. Most are free. iOS only; web platform available as well.
  • Read by QxMD: A platform to help you keep on top of new medical and scientific research. Searches PubMed and provides topic reviews as well. Free.
  • Calculate by QxMD: Clinical calculators and decision support tools for healthcare providers. Free.
  • Micromedex series: Drug calculators, interactions, and more. Most are free.
  • Medscape: Medical news and calculators, drug information & tools, disease information, etc. Free.

A close-up photo of a surgeon's face as he operates.

By Phallinn Ooi. [CC BY 2.0 via Flickr]

Take advantage of resources that are free or available with professional memberships.

The benefits of membership in professional societies usually include access to the society’s publications. (For example, membership in the American College of Physicians includes access to ACP Smart Medicine.) There are also many resources that are available for free – a selection of these is below.

  • BioMed Central: 150+ peer-reviewed open access health sciences journals.
  • Directory of Open Access Journals: 4,100+ open access journals in all subjects including dentistry, medicine, nursing, and public health.
  • Disease Management Project: Online medical textbook from the Cleveland Clinic.
  • FreeBooks4Doctors:  360+ medical textbooks arranged by specialty.
  • Free Medical Journals: 4000+ medical/health journals.
  • Guideline Index: 2,500+ summaries for various diseases and conditions from the National Guideline Clearinghouse.
  • HighWire Press Free Online Full-Text Articles: a massive archive of full-text articles on a variety of topics including medicine. Some are free, some require payment.
  • Medscape: Healthcare information from various medical publishers (registration is required).
  • Medscape Reference: Directory of information on more than 7,000 diseases and disorders, including images and multimedia content.
  • MerckMedicus: Medical news, online learning resources, and diagnostic tools (registration is required).
  • NCBI Bookshelf: A collection of online biomedical books from the National Library of Medicine.
  • PLoS Journals: Open access, peer-reviewed journals on a variety of topics published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS).
  • PMC (PubMed Central): A free full-text archive of nearly 4 million biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the National Library of Medicine.
  • RxList, The Internet Drug Index: An easy-to-search database of information about prescription medications. It includes a drug identification image database.

The faculty and staff of the Health Sciences Library wish you the very best of luck as you move on to exciting new endeavors. We are here to help you make a smooth transition! If we can be of any assistance as you plan your departure, please contact us — AskUs! or call us at (303) 724-2152.