Librarians in Print at the Strauss Health Sciences Library

Congratulations to Education & Reference Librarians Ben Harnke, Kristen DeSanto, Christi Piper, Nina McHale, and Lilian Hoffecker, who just published a featured article in Doody’s Core Titles about the recent changes to the department’s professional literature search service. The article, “Developing a Database for a Literature Search Service at an Academic Health Sciences Library,” details the process taken to revise and improve the organization of the Strauss Health Sciences Library’s search service for systematic reviews, grant proposals, book chapters, and other large publication projects.

Furthermore, DeSanto had an additional publication selected as a featured article with DCT on her role as a Clinical Librarian assisting inpatient teams in clinical rounding. In “Answering Questions at the Point of Care,” she provides an overview of her role as a librarian during clinical rounds, including the professional knowledge she brings to the role and the technologies and resources she uses the most in this unique setting.

Check out both of these articles in the links above, and join us in congratulating their hard work!

Katherine Anne Porter: An Account of the Influenza Epidemic of 1918 in Denver

In this third installment on the Influenza Epidemic of 1918, Paul Andrews takes a closer look at author Katherine Anne Porter, one of the epidemic’s many victims and a fortunate survivor.


Katherine Anne Porter was born in Indian Creek, Texas in 1890.  She moved to Chicago in 1914, and began working as an actress.  She returned to Texas in 1915, where she spent two years in a sanitarium while suffering from severe bronchitis.  While she was in the sanitarium, Katherine Anne Porter began to write, doing a gossip column and theatrical criticism for The Fort Worth Critic.  At the time of the Influenza Epidemic of 1918, Porter was living in Denver and writing for the Rocky Mountain News.

Katherine Anne Porter
before the epidemic

Katherine Anne Porter was one of the epidemic’s millions of victims.  She was cared for by her fiancé, a young Army lieutenant whose name remains a mystery.  She was ill for months, her fever so severe that her hair turned white, and eventually fell out.  She also suffered a broken arm when she fell, trying to get out of bed.  She developed phlebitis and was told she was never going to walk again.  When Katherine Anne Porter was finally moved to the hospital, she was so ill that the Rocky Mountain News wrote and type-set her obituary.  The young Army officer stayed by her side the entire time.  She spent six month in the hospital, but eventually her fever broke, her lungs cleared, and her arm and leg mended. She eventually returned to full health, although her hair remained white for the rest of her life. Tragically, her fiancé died.

The first edition of
Pale Horse, Pale Rider

After her recovery, Katherine Anne Porter moved to New York City, and began to write fiction.  She turned her experience of the epidemic into a short novel in 1939.  In Pale Horse, Pale Rider Porter tells the tale of Miranda, a newspaper writer in Denver, and her fiancé Adam, an Army officer.  As in her life, both become ill and Miranda lived, while Adam died.  It was perhaps a way for Porter to excise the memory of the epidemic.  She said the titles Pale Horse represented Death, who ‘takes away an entire era.’ Historian Alfred Crosby stated that Pale Horse, Pale Rider was such an excellent depiction of the epidemic that he dedicated his 1989 book America’s Forgotten Pandemic: The Influenza of 1918 to Porter.  Additionally, literary critic Paul Russel observed that Katherine Anne Porter is the only great American writer of the early 20th Century to depict the Influenza Epidemic of 1918.   It is still considered one of the finest works of medical fiction.

A US stamp was issued to honor Katherine Anne Porter in 2006

Katherine Anne Porter died in 1980 at the age of 90.


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HSL Welcomes Brandon Kennedy to Access Services!

The Health Sciences Library is happy to welcome our new access services specialist, Brandon Kennedy. Brandon will be helping out at the service desk and facilitating our incoming and outgoing items with Prospector.

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To welcome him to the library, we asked Brandon a few questions:

What is your interest in libraries?

I’ve been volunteering and working in libraries ever since I was in middle school. I enjoy the calm/safe environment that libraries give. I always feel at home when I’m inside a library!

What do you like most about the HSL so far?

What I like the most about working here so far is that I’ve been learning almost non-stop. I enjoy the challenges being brought to me!

What is your educational background?

I attended the University of Nevada Las Vegas, and was a photography major with a minor in art history. I was very into commercial photography: specifically fashion photography. I was also really big indo the history of marketing/commercial photography, which sparked my interest in archiving/digitizing film.

What is your previous work experience?

One of my first “official” jobs was actually working at one of my university’s branch libraries, the Teacher Development and Resources Library. I worked there from my first week of my undergrad up until graduation. I also had a huge interest in graphic design during the first half of my undergrad so I worked with UNLV’s Athletic Department designing billboards, flyers, posters, media guides, etc. Working there also gave me the experience and opportunity to land an internship at UFC where I worked with their U.S. creative team (can you believe there’s only 7 members).

What’s a fun/unique/interesting tidbit that you would like others to know about you?

I’m new to Colorado, I moved here from Las Vegas in May. I’ll be adopting a female poodle puppy in December, still iffy on names. (Welcome to a few suggestions.)

How do you spend your free time?

Aside from photography, I’m a huge MMO gamer, currently my favorite games to play are Fate/Grand Order and Final Fantasy 14. I also like watching a bunch of anime from the 90s.

Is there any additional information you’d like to share about yourself?

I’m currently looking into grad schools that offer a MLIS, archiving, special collections, and digitization are my biggest interests.

What do you hope to gain from working at HSL?

I hope to gain a more in depth work experience at HSL, I want to learn more on what happens behind the service desk. I would also like to gain knowledge on how my background in photography/graphic design could be integrated in a library setting and what I could do to help.


Be sure to welcome Brandon to the library when you see him around!

Connect Your Laptop Workstations

Working on something big? The Health Sciences Library is thrilled to offer full-size screens, keyboards, and mice at our brand new “Connect Your Laptop Workstations.” Connect your laptop using the cables provided and you’ll have a full 27” monitor to display your work in parallel or as an extended screen. Plus, whether you’re working with a brand new laptop or an older model, the HSL has a wide variety of adapters for checkout at the service desk to connect you to the workstations.

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Here’s how it works. The four Connect Your Laptop Workstations are located in the fourth pod of the north computer commons, next to the north printer station. Note the yellow placards on the table partitions. The four cables at the station are: USB3, connecting the keyboard and mouse to your laptop; VGA, connecting the monitor to an older laptop; HDMI, connecting high-definition video on newer laptops; and Mini Display Port, connecting video for a wide range of Apple products.

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Working with a brand new laptop and only have USB-C connections? Just check out an OMARS multi-port adapter from the service desk! This will allow you to use HDMI video, USB for keyboard/mouse, and still leave ports open for charging and connecting other devices.

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If you have any problems or need help getting started with a Connect Your Laptop Workstation, don’t hesitate to ask for assistance at the service desk during public access hours. If you have suggestions for this space or ideas on what technologies would be useful to you, let us know with a Tell Us comment!

What’s Happening in the Reading Room?

If you took a walk up to the third floor throughout the months of June and July, you probably noticed some big changes happening around the Reading Room and Art Gallery! The Health Sciences Library, in conjunction with University Facilities, have been making some big quality of life improvements to this popular space, from the addition of several new power outlets along the floors to the removal of the superficial pillars throughout the room, and we’re thrilled to present the new, multi-functional Reading Room!

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Along with the floor plan renovations, we also added brand new collapsible, modular tables and chairs, allowing for more possible room configurations than ever before. Without the bulky tables and chairs of years past, rearranging the whole room for your EMS reservation or an impromptu group meeting will be a snap!

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We have just a few more finishing touches for the room, but feel free to wander up to the third floor and check it out! The room’s daily schedule is posted on the outer door, and if it is not currently being reserved, you’re welcome to explore the space. We’ll be adding more pictures and posts to the HSL Blog as we start experimenting with different table layouts, including some brand new hex-shaped tables, great for small break-out groups.

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If you have any questions about making a room reservation through EMS—in the Reading Room or elsewhere—please reach out to Access Services by visiting the front desk or calling 303-724-2152 during regular business hours.

HSL Welcomes Rob Cincotta!

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On Tuesday, June 12th, the Health Sciences Library threw a party in the second floor staff lounge welcoming Rob Cincotta, and we had a chance to speak with him about his background and upcoming work. Rob, who resides in Aurora and spent most of his life in Las Vegas, joins us in the much-needed role of Desktop Support Specialist for the IT department. He got his start in computers shortly after leaving the Air Force, when he joined the staff of a newspaper working on mainframe computers. “I’ve gone from the newspaper, to retail, to my own business doing computer service for almost 20 years,” he says. “I just really enjoy computers.”

After building his computer skill set, he took a break from traditional service and worked as a field service engineer for a medical technology company, installing medical equipment across the country. He then spent the past five years working as an IT contractor for NIST, but after five years of commuting to Boulder, he was looking for something closer to home.

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When it comes to his current role, he says he’s most excited about our specialized clientele. “It’s a smaller client base than I serviced in my previous job,” he says, and that he’s looking forward to being able to offer more personalized service. “I get to know people better.”

Another aspect that drew him to the HSL is our variety of unique patron needs. “I don’t like doing the same old thing every day,” he says, “and that happens to work out well in this industry, because everything is ever-changing.”

When you see Rob around the library, be sure to give him a warm welcome, and if you ever find yourself in need of desktop assistance, he has some great advice to offer: “Don’t be afraid to ask for help!”

Connecting Papers to the Library Proxy

Since the recent change to the Health Sciences Library proxy server, we’ve received numerous connectivity error reports from users of the citation management software Papers. While we are more than happy to assist with issues related to the proxy link, please keep in mind that the library does not provide in-depth support or troubleshooting for Papers. If you would like to use a citation management program that the library does support and troubleshoot for, we recommend switching to EndNote. You can find more information about EndNote here: http://hslibraryguides.ucdenver.edu/endnote/cuanschutz


The Health Sciences Library proxy link has changed. To update your Papers library to remain connected to the Health Sciences Library, complete the following steps to update your Proxy settings.

  1. Access the settings box for Papers by following this path: Papers (main menu) – Preferences – Access
    Step 1
  2. In the “Use Library Proxy” menu, select: Other
    Step 2
  3. Enter the following Proxy details:
    1. Institution: University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
    2. EXProxy URL: http://proxy.hsl.ucdenver.edu/login?url=%@Step 3
  4. Click “Done” at the bottom.
  5. On the “Access” screen, your “Use Library Proxy” box should now say: Other: University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
  6. Now fill in the Library Website URL: https://hslibrary.ucdenver.edu/
    Step 6
  7. You have now set up your Library Proxy access!  You can close the settings box.

If you have any questions about the Proxy link, you can contact AskUs at 303-255-2152 or askus@hsl.ucdenver.libanswers.com.