De-Stress @ Strauss!

CU Anschutz Anti-All Nighter Calendar, De-Stress at Strauss Library Wed. May 8th at 5pm

Join us all next week for a range of stress relief events at the Strauss Health Sciences Library! Each day, we’ll have a unique event featuring tips and treats to help alleviate some finals anxiety, but the highlight is Wednesday evening, May 8th, when we’re hosting an “Anti-All Nighter” at the library in conjunction with CU Anschutz Student Services. This event will include a free pancake food truck, a silent disco (indoors or outdoors, weather permitting), a VR demonstration from our friends at Inworks, yoga in the Reading Room, licensed therapy dogs from the Alliance of Therapy Dogs, and much more!

You can RSVP now, or read on to learn more about the week-long festivities.  


  • Tuesday 5/7/19 @ Noon; Strauss Library Tower Room

Mindfulness and Guided Meditation with Mimi Munroe

Come for a discussion on mindfulness and guided meditation! Pita trays and drinks will be provided.


  • Wednesday 5/8/19 @ 5 pm – 9 pm; Strauss Library

De-Stress @ Strauss Library

Pancakes, Puppies, and Silent Disco! BRING YOUR STUDENT ID to participate. Take a break and enter to win one of our door prizes, including a Galaxy Tablet, courtesy of the Writing Center.


  • Thursday 5/9/19 @ Noon; Strauss Library Front Lobby

Tech Talk with the Library IT Department

Learn about all the technology and IT services that the Library has to offer with the Strauss Library IT Department. We have Windows and MacBook specialists who keep up to date on all the new laptops and gadgets available, as well as pizza!


  • Friday 5/10/19 @ Noon; Strauss Library Reading Room

Self-Care Training with Matt Vogl

Matt is the Executive Director of the National Mental Health Innovation Center, and has recently given a talk at TedxMileHigh on the topic of “How virtual reality can improve your mental health.” Pita tray and drinks will be provided.


Post by Jason Wardell, Access Services. Get in touch via email or AskUs with any questions.

CDC launches new FREE eLearning course addressing health literacy, limited English proficiency, and cultural differences

9 out of 10 adults struggle to understand and use health information when it’s unfamiliar, complex or jargon-filled. Limited health literacy costs the healthcare system money and results in higher than necessary morbidity and mortality.

Health care professionals and non-medical staff can register for Effective Communication for Healthcare Teams: Addressing Health Literacy, Limited English Proficiency and Cultural Differences. The lessons and practice activities in this course help healthcare professionals assess their patients’ health literacy and language needs and practice culturally competent care.

Continuing education provided for

  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • Certified Health Education Specialists
  • Pharmacists
  • Certified Public Health Professionals

Register for this FREE Course today by setting up your CDC TRAIN profile and launching the course at https://www.train.org/main/training_plan/3985.

If you have questions please contact healthliteracy@cdc.gov

Spring Picks from the Strauss Library Staff

This spring, we asked the employees of the Strauss Health Sciences Library about some of their favorite springtime books, movies, podcasts, and other media. Here’s the collected list from our staff and faculty. If any of these catch your eye, you can request them via Prospector—the regional catalog connecting you to a wide range of libraries throughout Colorado and Wyoming—a free service for CU Anschutz students, staff, and faculty. Order your item on Prospector today, and we’ll let you know when it arrives! For more information, and to start using Prospector, visit: https://hslibrary.ucdenver.edu/prospector

Four books displayed on a counter with a bookmark: Lovecraft Country, Into Thin Air, Slaughterhouse 90210, Consider Phlebas

Books

  • American Hippo by Sarah Gailey – Jason, Access Services
  • Call Me By Your Name by André Aciman – Danielle, Collection Management
  • Garden books – Shelley, Collection Management
  • Harry Potter (Books & Movies) – Kristin, IT
  • Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer – Lynn S., Access Services
  • Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff – Wlad, Education & Reference
  • Once Upon a River by Dianne Setterfield – Jessica, Collection Management
  • PG Wodehouse, the Culture Series by Iain Banks, Philip Pullman – Paul, Collection Management
  • Slaughterhouse 90210 by Maris Kreizman – Yumin, Collection Management
  • What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear by Danielle Ofri, MD – Lisa, Deputy Director

Movies/TV

  • Billions – Lisa, Deputy Director
  • Dumb & Dumber – Lynn T., Access Services
  • Game of Thrones – Jeff, IT (and several other people, too!)
  • Harry Potter! – Kristin, IT
  • Inconceivable – Mike, IT
  • The Americans – Melissa, Director
  • The Entire James Bond Collection – Rob, IT
  • The Passion of the Christ – Thinh, IT
  • The Sandlot – Brittany, Access Services
  • Weekend at Bernie’s – Douglas, Access Services

Podcasts

Magazines

  • Men’s Health – Kevin, IT
  • Rock & Gem – Emily, Collection Management

Forgetting the Influenza Epidemic of 1918

In this fourth and final installment on the Influenza Epidemic of 1918, Paul Andrews considers its enduring legacy–or lack thereof.


As the United States celebrated the end of the First World War on November 11th, 1918, they also celebrated the end of the worst of the Influenza Epidemic that killed so many. Although waves of influenza did still hit parts of the world through 1920, they were not as deadly as the strain that killed so many in 1918.  One theory posits that the strain that killed so many had taken all the victims it could, and mutated into something more benign.  As the worst of the effects of the epidemic faded, so did the memory. It’s as if the world had decided that it just wanted to forget the flu epidemic had happened at all. Alfred Crosby, in his 1976 book America’s Forgotten Pandemic wrote ‘the flu never inspired awe, not in 1918, and not since.’ The epidemic simply disappeared from the American consciousness.  With the exception of Katherine Anne Porter, and a few other writes, the epidemic was never part of American culture or public memory.

Why did one of the deadliest modern plagues simply disappear from memory? Some believe that it was because illness and death was still something familiar in the early 20th century, as it was in earlier times. The loss of so much life from a sickness, especially if the victim died at home, just didn’t impact individuals as much as that kind of death would affect us today. We rely on science and medicine to deal with illness more than ever today.  In 1918, science failed completely to find the cause or cure to the epidemic. Dr. Victor Vaughn, the head of the Army’s communicable disease division, said, when the worst of the plague was over, ‘Never again allow me to say that medical science is on the verge of conquering disease.’ The epidemic was a huge blow to the ego of doctors.  They could do nothing but watch the tragedy unfold.  About the only thing that could be done for the victims of the flu was bed rest, manage their pain, keep them warm, and to isolate them as much as possible.  While doctors could do little, it was nurses that took care of the sick and dying.

Elizabeth Onion believes this is another reason the Influenza Epidemic of 1918 was so quickly forgotten.  The true heroes of the disaster were women; nurses, and home caregivers.  Care of the sick at home has always been a thankless task, mainly left to women.  Today hospital and home care nurses act as care givers to those who don’t have that kind of support available. Onion writes ‘A close read of recent history suggests that the 20th century silence about the flu epidemic of 1918-19 shows how uneasy many Americans have been with failure, death, and loss, and how strongly most of the nation seems to prefer stories that celebrate heroic achievements to those that memorialize acts of caregiving.’ She also believes that the optimism that often typifies American behavior and culture made it easier for the country to simply forget the failure of an epidemic that ran out of control.

Hand in hand with this optimism is the belief people have about their own health.  After the 2009 swine flu epidemic, Mark Davis conducted a study of how people reacted to the flu outbreak that infected so many, but that had relatively few victims. His research showed that most people believe that their health choices- diet, exercise, and general good habits- allowed them to push through the worst of a flu. They believed flu was inevitable, but they would be able to survive it.

And flu is inevitable.  Seasonal flu has killed somewhere between 3,000 to 48,000 people in the last forty years.  The numbers are hard to pin down, because flu deaths are often misreported.  The 2009 H1N1 swine flu killed 60 people in Mexico.  One of the two major avian flu strains, H7N6, jumped to humans in 2013 in China, killing something between 1,030 to 2,400 people.  The threat of another epidemic is always present, and many believe that it’s not a matter of if another pandemic strikes, but when.  Science and medicine have may vast advancements in the last 100 years, and we are better prepared to deal with a crisis like the influenza epidemic as before, but we are still unable to know what vaccines will work against what flu strains. 

Although the history of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic is being studied more now than in the past, many of the lessons of the crisis have not been learned.  John Barry, author of the book The Great Influenza, believes that one of the most important lessons to learn from the 1918 epidemic was that government officials must be up front and honest with the public. He was asked to speak at an emergency preparedness event that centered on an epidemic, and made this clear, to the agreement of all the attendees. When the event started he was stunned that the first ‘statement’ drafted to the public was meant to minimize the threat of the disaster.  Even then, the lessons of 1918 weren’t learned. 

New Cytoscopy Exhibit on the 2nd Floor

Modern cystoscopy and endoscopy has its roots in a physician’s need for a better way to examine their patients internally, and the imagination that need drove.

The first scope for examination was created in 1804, and developments have not slowed. 

Visit the second floor rotunda on the South side of the Strauss Health Sciences Library to view a new exhibit exploring the history and development of cystoscopy equipment.

Strauss Health Sciences Library loan artifacts to Norlin Library

Norlin Library at the University of Colorado Boulder campus is exhibiting the National Library of Medicine’s exhibit Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries on the Second Floor from February 4 through March 16, 2019.  The Strauss Health Sciences Library is pleased to have lent some of the library’s artifacts to the exhibit, including our 1858 George Tiemann Surgical Equipment Co.  field surgical kit.  If you need an excuse to visit Boulder, be sure to visit Norlin and view the exhibit. 

https://www.colorado.edu/libraries/events/exhibits/binding-wounds-pushing-boundaries-african-americans-civil-war-medicine

Dr. Kildare Board Game Exhibit on 2nd Floor

Strauss Health Sciences Library’s Collection Development Technician, Paul Andrews is back with a brand new exhibit in the 2nd Floor rotunda!


The Dr. Kildare board game was donated by Dr. Robert H. Shikes. M.D.

Dr. Kildare ran for five seasons on NBC from 1961 to 1966.  The show starred Richard Chamberlin as Dr. James Kildare, a popular character created by writer Frederick Faust, the subject of a series of MGM films and radio series in the 30s and 40s.  Dr. Kildare took place at Blair General Hospital and told the story of a young intern learning how to be a doctor.

The Strauss Health Sciences Library has a Dr. Kildare game that was released by IDEAL in 1962.  The object of the game is to visit the rooms indicated on the Diagnosis Cards and collect Doctor Cards, which mark the rooms you’ve visited.  Once you have visited the thirteen rooms needed to make a diagnosis, you use the wheel to decode what is wrong with your patient.  The first one to collect and decipher their cards is the winner. 

Visit the second floor rotunda, on the south side of the library to view the Dr. Kildare Game exhibit.  If that sparks your need to play a board game, visit the Service Desk on the first floor, where you can check out Scrabble, Yahtzee, Chess, and Operation!


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