Featured book in September

Pictorial atlas

Pictorial Atlas of Acupuncture: An illustrated Manual of Acupuncture Points

Knowledge of the exact status and relevance of acupuncture points is an essential tool for the acupuncture therapist.  The novice may worry that he will have to learn all the acupuncture points by heart.  But experience shows that only about one third of these points at most are actually used in treatment.  For this reason the value of an atlas that provides information about a currently important, but seldom used, point cannot be stressed enough.

This comprehensive atlas, beautifully produced with great graphic clarity, is the result of unique collaboration between German and Chinese experts.

The atlas is also noteworthy for the courage of the editors, authors, and the publisher in limiting the indications of the various points to their application uses.  This is an area in which the importance of the points has undergone great diversification.  These indications have been examined in a meticulous discussion process and redundant or dubious findings discarded.

This pioneering initiative means a substantial gain in practical use, which can only benefit the reader in the practice of acupuncture.

Prof. Dr. Dr. Thomas Ots

3rd floor, Special Collections
Indig WB 369 L693p 2012

Stillness of Life

A new exhibit in the Gallery:

On Display September 3 to October 31, 2018 in the Health Sciences Library Gallery

Please join the artist, Olga Karpeisky, for Two Receptions on

Wednesday, September 5, 3:00 to 6:00 pm & Saturday, October 6, 12:00 to 3:00 pm

Stillness flyer

Featured book for April

2018CrossingOver_Apr-1

 

SHSL-Color-18041109340

2018CrossingOver_Apr-2

Stephen Jay Gould and Rosamond Wolff Purcell

….The essays and photographs collected here present art and science in conversation, rather than in opposition. As Gould writes in his preface, although the two disciplines may usually communicate in different dialects, when juxtaposed they strikingly reflect upon and enhance one another. Working together, Purcell’s photographs and Gould’s scientific musings speak to us about ourselves and our world in a hybrid language richer than either could command on its own….

Through its unique combination of works and photographs, Crossing Over prompts us to ponder not only the basis of the false dichotomy between art and science, but also the distinction of mind and nature, and of all humanly imposed categories of order. Gould and Purcell’s work convinces the reader that a provocative interplay between art and science is not only possible, but inevitable and necessary as well.

3rd floor Special Collections, Humanities
HUM Q 171 G698c 2000

Check out the record for the book here!

Featured Book for January

HerbalTeas

Healing Herbal Teas

A complete guide to making delicious, healthful beverages

“…Want to customize your own herbal blends?  Mars, who is often applauded for her ability to bring together the wisdom of disparate healing traditions, shows you how, offering basic guidelines as well as theories from different cultures and eras.  And, as Mars explains, teas are not just for sipping!  For treating everything from wounds and rashes to sore muscles, colds and flu, and dandruff, try topical applications of tea.

If you become a true tea aficionado, you’ll want to share your passion by indulging in the high culture of tea: tea parties.  These events can be organized to welcome guests, to renew friendships, or to simply celebrate life.  Inside, you’ll find ideas for organizing tea parties, as well as Mars’ favorite recipes to serve with teas.”

3rd floor Special Collections, Indigenous
INDIG WB 438 M363h 2006

Featured book for October

Couch_Fiction

Story by Philippa Perry

“Ever wanted an insight into counselling?  Or wished you could be a ‘fly-on-the-wall’ in a psychotherapy session?  Couch Fiction allows you to peep through the keyhole of the therapy room door and, more than that, read the minds of the protagonists…

Based on a case study of Pat (our sandal-wearing, cat-loving psychotherapist) and her new client, James (an ambitious barrister with a potentially harmful habit he can’t stop), this graphic novel follows the anxieties, frustrations, mind-wanderings and break-throughs of each, through a year of therapy sessions together. Beautifully illustrated and accompanied by succinct and illuminating footnotes, this book offers a witty and thought-provoking exploration of the therapeutic journey, considering a range of skills, insights and techniques along the way.”

Medical Humanities 3rd floor
WM 420 P464c 2010

Linda Susak – Landscape Painter

Grand Staircase

Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument 2017

October 2 – 31, 2017

Opening Reception: Thursday, October 5, 4-6pm
There will be a drawing for a free painting and food and drinks at the opening reception! Come by and check out my latest paintings!

Health Sciences Library Gallery, 3rd floor
University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus

Library address, directions and parking maps:
Website
Email

Passages – Sarah Van Beckum

Van Beckum flyer

The show ends on September 29, 2017. Join us in the Health Sciences Library Gallery as we display Sarah Van Beckum’s latest journey into abstracting nature’s forms.

The moods and whims of nature influence my work. Making art is a deeply engaging process. As an observer by type, my art can be quiet and contemplative or energetic and aggressive. Drawing from nature’s forms, ingrained from the countryside of my youth, painting is my search for meaning – Sarah Van Beckum

Phrenology – Mid 19th to early 20th century

From the 1840s to the 1920s, the popular medical movement of Phrenology took hold in the U.S. During this time phrenology was similar to pop-psychology. Phrenology was the pseudo-science that claimed to be able to identify a person’s character by the bumps on their skull. The ‘evidence’ was the belief that the brain was made up of 37 unique organs that each controlled a behavior or personality trait. Many practitioners of Phrenology, including most famously the Fowler family, believed that the organs could be exercised and a person could have a better and happier life. It also had contemporary critics and a sinister side.

The Health Science Library has several distinctive artifacts from the mid-19th to early 20th Century practice of Phrenology on exhibit. Please visit the second floor rotunda to experience the past of Phrenology.

Paul Andrews, MA
Collection Development

Featured book for June


Tell me everything you don’t remember

The stroke that changed my life

by Christine Hyung-Oak Lee

“Christine Hyung-Oak Lee woke up with a headache on the morning of December 31, 2006. By that afternoon, she saw the world–quite literally–upside down. By New Year’s Day, she was unable to form a coherent sentence. And after hours in the ER, days in the hospital, and multiple questions and tests, her doctors informed her that she had had a stroke.

For months afterward, Lee outsourced her memories to a journal, taking diligent notes to compensate for the thoughts she could no longer hold on to. It is from these notes that she has constructed this frank and compelling memoir. …

Lee illuminates the connection between memory and identity in an honest, meditative, and truly funny manner, utterly devoid of self-pity. And as she recovers, she begins to realize that this unexpected and devastating event has provided a catalyst for coming to terms with her true self–and, in a way, has allowed her to become the person she’s always wanted to be.”

Medical Humanities/3rd floor Special Collections
WL 356 L477t 2017