Small Changes Can Make a Big Difference: Best Practices in Caring for LGBTQ Patients and Families

Members of the LGBTQ — lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer – community often face health disparities linked to social stigma, discrimination, and denial of civil and human rights. Data systems used to monitor LGBTQ populations and their health needs are sparse and healthcare environments have been slow to openly acknowledge this community.

Those who serve as health and staff educators have the power to drive effective changes to create a welcoming environment for LGBTQ patients, families, and caregivers.

Tips for creating an inclusive clinical setting:

  • Identify as an ally: Offer an online directory of health care providers and administrative staff who have self-identified as LGBTQ trained, allies and/or “out.”
  • Host a workshop: Human Resources and/or hospital Diversity Committees may offer workshops for staff on how to provide LGBTQ-sensitive care. The Safe Zone Project is a free online resource that can be used to create curriculums on LGBTQ awareness.
  • Offer visual cues: In outward-facing materials, such as health education resources and marketing campaigns use imagery of same sex couples and families. Post signage near restrooms that welcome use based on gender identity.
  • Collect data: Integrate sexual orientation and gender identity demographic questions into the electronic health record. Patients have the right to opt in or out of self-identifying.
  • Get patient’s preferred name and pronouns: During the registration or medical history process, ask the patient for their preferred name/pronoun and document it in the electronic health record (note that the name may not match insurance and identification documents).
  • Be sensitive when discussing relationships. When asking about relationships, use terms such as “unmarried partner” and “spouse.” Ask the gender of sexual partners as well as gynecologic history (many transgender men retain a cervix, uterus, and breast tissue).

Resources:

-Dana Abbey, Community Engagement Coordinator

Workshop on Advancing Biomedical Research with AI and Machine Learning

NIH is excited to announce that registration is open for a full-day public workshop, “Harnessing Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning to Advance Biomedical Research,” Monday, July 23, 2018, 8:45 a.m. – 4:40 p.m. at the Porter Neuroscience Research Center, Building 35 on the NIH Main Campus. To explore the opportunities for artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) in biomedical research, NIH will bring together leaders in innovation and science for a robust and in-depth discussion.

Presenters at the workshop include leading experts from Amazon and IBM, and scientists at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, and the University of Cincinnati who are employing AI/ML in biomedical research settings. Craig Mundie, who served on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) and was formerly Microsoft’s Chief Research Strategy Officer, will deliver the keynote address. Speakers will engage with workshop participants on AI and ML topics such as integration into healthcare, future uses in biomedical research, the potential for enhancing clinical care and scientific discovery, and ethical considerations.

For additional details on the Workshop, Speakers and Agenda, please visit the workshop webpage.

To attend the Workshop, participants must register. Please note that space is limited.

The Workshop will be available and archived on Videocast: https://videocast.nih.gov/summary.asp?live=28053&bhcp=1

Embed the NCBI Sequence Viewer into Your Pages

Search NCBI

Clear input

The newest video on the NCBI YouTube channel introduces the Sequence Viewer embedding API. A few quick examples illustrate how easy it is to embed Sequence Viewer into your own pages.

Sequence Viewer is a graphical view of sequences and color-coded annotations on regions of sequences stored in the Nucleotide and Protein databases.

Subscribe to the NCBI YouTube channel to receive alerts about new videos ranging from quick tips to full webinar presentations.

5 Questions you can answer using Gene

The Gene resource from NCBI is a central hub for accessing nearly all molecular and literature resources for a particular gene. You can easily answer the most common questions and perform the most common tasks by starting in Gene.

In this webinar you will learn about the structure and contents of the Gene resource and how to use Gene to answer the following questions about a gene:

  • Where is the gene located (chromosome and position) in the genome assembly?
  • What are the Reference genomic, transcript and protein sequences for the gene?
  • What variations are present in the gene and are they associated with disease?
  • In what tissues and under what conditions is the gene expressed?
  • What are the equivalent genes (homologs) in other species?

Presenters:

Peter Cooper and Bonnie Maidak, NCBI

Class Details:

Mar 9, 2017

1:00PM – 2:00PM ET

Registration: https://nnlm.gov/class/five-questions-you-can-answer-using-ncbi-gene-database/7094

 

NCBI Minute Webinar: Finding Gene, Protein and Chemical Names, Aliases and Synonyms on February 8, 2017

NCBI staff will discuss the systems in the NCBI Gene and PubChem resources that identify and correlate various names used for genes, proteins, and chemicals.

Date and time: February 8, 2017 10:00 AM MT

To register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6498213056303481858

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the Webinar. After the live presentation, the Webinar will be uploaded to the NCBI YouTube channel. Any related materials will be accessible on the Webinars and Courses page.

Beta Version of ClinicalTrials.gov Available for Testing

A new beta version of ClinicalTrials.gov is available for user testing. The test site can be accessed from a link on the homepage (see Figure 1) or directly at https://clinicaltrials.gov/beta/. The beta site will be available for at least one month to obtain feedback from the public. The new version of ClinicalTrials.gov was developed to provide new features to support searching for clinical studies.

ctgov_fig1Key features of the beta version include:

  • “Filters” for refining search results
  • “Show/Hide Columns” for customizing the display of search results
  • “Saved Studies” for storing and retrieving particular study records of interest

For more information, please visit the National Library of Medicine’s Technical Bulletin.

Visualize and Interpret Alignment Data with the Multiple Sequence Alignment Viewer

fig1-1fggy_retina_labels.pngThe NCBI Multiple Sequence Alignment Viewer (MSAV) is a versatile web application that helps you visualize and interpret MSAs for both nucleotide and amino acid sequences. You can display alignment data from many sources, and the viewer is easily embedded into your own web pages with customizable options. An even simpler way to use MSAV is to use their page, upload your data, and share the link to a fully functional viewer displaying your results. Click here for more information.