Colorado Drugstore Bottles

The Colorado drugstore bottles were donated by Dr. Robert H. Shikes. M.D.

Gold was discovered in Colorado in 1859, and a huge influx of prospectors flooded the territory to strike it rich.  Soon Denver, where some of the first traces of gold were found at the confluence of Cherry Creek and the Platte River, became the center of the much of the growth of what would become the state of Colorado.  The new settlers required the services of many professions to help them in their new lives, including doctors and pharmacists.  Soon, the local drugstore was an integral part of the community.

The local drugstore provided the medications locally compounded and placed in unique glass bottles that also served as advertisements.  The local drugstore served the people Colorado up until large chain drugstores began to buy local stores in the early 20th Century.

Visit the South 2nd floor landing to explore some of the Health Sciences Library’s collection of Colorado Drugstore Bottles.

Paul Andrews, MA

Collection Development

New Exhibit Space in the Library

Please visit the Denison Family and Dr. Florence Sabin exhibits at their new home on the first floor of the Health Sciences Library.

Two exhibit cases that were previously in the Reading Room on the third floor have been moved to the first floor.  These exhibit cases explore the histories of the Denison Family and Dr. Florence Sabin, perhaps one of the most famous doctors from Colorado.

Dr. Charles Denison was a prominent Denver physician who also taught, did ground breaking research in climate and tuberculosis, and invented a stethoscope that became a standard in the early 20th century.  In 1924, his wife Ella Strong Denison, donated the funds to build a new medical library in his honor.  The Charles Denison Memorial Library was the health sciences library on the 9th Avenue University of Colorado Health Sciences Center campus until it closed in 2007, when the Health Sciences Library moved to the Anschutz Medical Campus.

Dr. Florence Sabin’s connection to the University of Colorado was a long one.  In 1937, she delivered the keynote address at the dedication of the Charles Denison, M/D. Memorial Library.  On her 80th birthday, a wing of the original University of Colorado hospital was named in her honor.  When the new University of Colorado Hospital was built in 1962, the building became the University of Colorado School of Medicine.  The auditorium that bore Dr. Sabin’s name was used by students until the day the 9th Ave campus was closed.  Many of the artifacts displayed here were housed in the auditorium, and when the campus moved, they became a permanent part of the Health Sciences Library’s collection.

Fun, Weird Words

For the second installment of our Fun, Weird Words, I thought I’d share…

Hum Durgeon — an imaginary illness, from the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

Frobly-mobly — feeling neither well nor unwell, from the 18th Century. The modern version, I think, would be “meh”

And my personal favorite (if only I could remember it so early in the morning) is:

Dysania — extreme difficulty getting out of bed (especially in the morning), from the early 1900’s

Fun, Weird Words

After recently coming across the 13th century term “forswunk” on the “British Medieval History” Facebook page, and sharing its delightful meaning with coworkers (“exhausted from too much work. To be ‘foreswunk’ is to be exhausted before you even begin”), we decided to share this and other fun, weird, and wonky work- or medically-relevant words with our wider readership.  Here are a couple to go along with ‘foreswunk’:

Fudgel (18th C): the act of giving the impression of working, but actually doing nothing.

Perendinate (19th C): to put off, specifically until the day-after-tomorrow.

Keep Up with The Appendix

Students, Staff, and Faculty, there’s a great way to keep up with the happenings of the Health Sciences Library and the Anschutz Medical Campus: subscribe to the monthly Newsletter, the Appendix! You’ll find info on upcoming events, great new resources, staff bios, suggestions for easier access, improved services, and more! The highlights of our blog, compiled and delivered directly to your inbox. The subscription process is easy, and if you change your mind down the road, so is unsubscribing. (Although we will be sorry to see you go!) Browse through our past issues, and subscribe here!

Fitzsimons Commemoration Medal — Colorado’s Most Significant Artifact?

The Health Sciences Library is proud to have our Fitzsimons Commemoration Medal as one of the finalist entries in 2017’s Colorado’s Most Significant Artifacts.  Please visit Colorado Collections online at https://collectioncare.auraria.edu to vote for this unique part of the campus’s history.

Here’s the notice and information from the Center for Colorado and The West at Auraria:

Congratulations!

We are please to announce that your nomination of the Commemoration Medallion will be voted on by the general public as one of Colorado’s 2017 Most Significant Artifacts!  A link to all the artifacts, and voting form, is located on the front page of our website:  https://collectioncare.auraria.edu

Voting opened on Monday, September 25th. We encourage you to notify your staff, colleagues, volunteers, family and friends to vote. Ten artifacts with the most public votes will be announced in late November 2017.

Thank you for your nomination and participation in this years Colorado’s Most Significant Artifacts campaign.

–Paul Andrews

 

“The Highest and Healthiest State”

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY
10TH ANNIVERSARY
LECTURE SERIES
“The Highest & Healthiest State”
Tom Noel, PhD
Professor of History, Director of Public History, Preservation and Colorado Studies
University of Colorado Denver

A quick, lighthearted overview of medicine in the highest state from Native American physicians to the Anschutz Medical Campus.

Friday, October 13, 2017
12:00-1:00pm
Reading Room
3rd floor, Health Sciences Library
Lunch provided

Register

Thomas Jacob Noel is a Professor of History and Director of Public History, Preservation & Colorado Studies at the University of Colorado Denver. Tom is the  author or coauthor of 50 books many articles. He was a longtime Sunday columnist for The Denver Post and the Rocky Mountain News. He appears regularly  as “Dr. Colorado” on Channel 9’s “Colorado & Company.” Tom completed his B.A. at the University of Denver and his M.A. and Ph.D. at CU-Boulder where his mother (a psychiatrist) and grandmother (a teacher) also did their graduate work. Please check http://dr-colorado.com/ for a full resume and updated list of his books, classes, tours and talks. Tom’s latest books include A Short History of Denver, Denver Landmarks & Historic Districts. His book, Colorado: A  Historical Atlas, won three prizes as the best regional history book of 2016.

 

–Kristen Desanto

“Louis Pasteur, Artist”

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY
10TH ANNIVERSARY
LECTURE SERIES
“Louis Pasteur, Artist”
Joe Gal, PhD
Professor Emeritus, Department of Pathology
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Louis Pasteur is admired around the world as a benefactor of humanity for his discoveries and inventions in microbiology and infectious diseases. Much less  well known is that he was a talented artist who as a teenager created first-rate images, mostly portraits of family, friends, and town notables, in pastel, charcoal, pencil, and lithography. He abandoned work as an artist at age 20 but maintained close connections to the world of art and artists for the rest of his life.

Friday, October 20, 2017
12:00-1:00pm
Reading Room
3rd floor, Health Sciences Library
Lunch provided

Register

Joseph Gal earned a master’s degree in chemistry at the Illinois Institute of Technology and a PhD in organic chemistry at the University of California Davis.  He then began a career on the faculty of University of Colorado School of Medicine and retired recently as professor emeritus. For many years he has focused  his scholarly activities on the history of science and medicine.

 

–Kristen Desanto

“Text Mining, Natural Language Processing, and the Future of the Library”

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY
10TH ANNIVERSARY
LECTURE SERIES
“Text Mining, Natural Language Processing, and the Future of the Library”
Larry Hunter, PhD
Professor, Department of Pharmacology
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Computational methods of information retrieval have revolutionized librarianship. Developments in text mining and natural language processing are likely to bring equally profound change to how scientists and clinicians interact with the biomedical literature!

Tuesday, October 3, 2017
12:00-1:00pm
Reading Room
3rd floor, Health Sciences Library
Lunch provided

Register

Dr. Lawrence Hunter is the Director of the University of Colorado’s Computational Bioscience Program and a Professor of Pharmacology (School of Medicine)  and Computer Science (Boulder). He received a Ph.D. in computer science from Yale University in 1989, and then joined the National Institutes of Health as a
staff scientist, first at the National Library of Medicine and then at the National Cancer Institute, before coming to Colorado in 2000. Dr. Hunter is widely  recognized as one of the founders of bioinformatics; he served as the first President of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB), and
created several of the most important conferences in the field, including ISMB, PSB and VIZBI. Dr. Hunter’s research interests span a wide range of areas,  from cognitive science to rational drug design.

 

–Kristen Desanto

10th Anniversary Lecture Series

Health Sciences Library

10th Anniversary Lecture Series

All lectures take place from 12:00-1:00pm in the Health Sciences Library Reading Room (3rd floor), and lunch will be provided.

Please register by clicking on the hyperlinks below

Friday, October 13: Dr. Tom Noel, “The Highest & Healthiest State”

Friday, October 20: Dr. Joe Gal, “Louis Pasteur, Artist”

In October, the Health Sciences Library will celebrate its 10th anniversary on the Anschutz Medical Campus. A variety of celebratory activities are planned throughout October, including a weekly lunchtime lecture series. All members of the campus community are invited to attend, and may register by clicking on one of the following links: Friday, October 13: Dr. Tom Noel, “The Highest & Healthiest State”; Friday, October 20: Dr. Joe Gal, “Louis Pasteur, Artist”. All lectures take place from 12:00-1:00pm in the Health Sciences Library Reading Room (3rd floor), and lunch will be provided.

 

–Kristen Desanto

PastPerfect — An Artifacts Database

Did you know that the Health Sciences Library has a unique collection of medical artifacts, consisting of a wide range of objects, dating from the 19th century? Besides view these artifacts in several rotating exhibits of the artifacts throughout the library, the collection is available for individual research. If you would like to search the artifact collection, visit the Library’s newest database- PastPerfect Online- http://uchslibrary.pastperfectonline.com/ All the artifacts listed in the catalog are available for anyone to look at, with an appointment.  Searching help is included on the page, or you can contact Paul Andrews at paul.andrewes@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2113 for assistance.

Denver & Tuberculosis

tb-denver-1

The library features a new exhibit in the Reading Room, including a collection of artifacts related to TB and Denver. Thomas Galbreath, in his book Chasing the Cure in Colorado (1907) believed that if all the people who had come to Denver for their health left, the city would lose 50% of its population. At the end of the 19th Century, and beginning of the 20th Century, Denver, and Colorado as a whole gained a reputation as a haven for those suffering from tuberculosis, then called consumption or the white plague.  Sanitariums spring up all over the state, many in the Denver metro area.  Along with the sanitarium movement, several products, some helpful and many scams, flooded the market to increase public health and education.  Visit the Health Science Library’s Reading Room to view several of artifacts the Library has in it’s collection that are connected to the fight against tuberculosis.

tb-denver-2

–Paul Andrews