Open Access Week 2019

Every year, during the month of October, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) organizes the international event Open Access Week. For one week we focus on the importance and need for Open Access scholarship and, as SPARC has said, it provides “an opportunity for open access advocates to engage their communities to teach them about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.”

So, how does the Strauss Health Sciences Library support Open Access?

The Strauss Library supports Open Access in several ways. To start, Open Access is part of the Strauss Library’s Collection Development Policy and we regularly make Open Access content available through our library catalog.  Here are some examples of Open Access journals currently available in our catalog:

In addition to providing access to Open Access, the Strauss Library supports the CU Anschutz campus publishing in Open Access journals. If campus affiliates publish in an Open Access journal, depending on their author rights, they can preserve their article in our institutional repository, Mountain Scholar, as well. Learn more about Mountain Scholar.

How is Open Access relevant to the medical and health sciences field?

Open Access is beneficial to all subjects and fields. Allowing your research to be freely available will generally increase citations, support further advances in the field, and increase representation in the field.
Here are examples of Open Access in the medical and health sciences fields:

  • Open Access Research | Gail Rees
    • 3-minute YouTube video about the impact of Dr. Rees’s open access works
  • Open Source Malaria project
    • According to SPARC, it “invites scientists from around the around to freely share their research on anti-malaria drugs through a transparent, online platform. The hope is to accelerate discovery of new drug candidates to be entered into pre-clinical development. All data and ideas are shared openly. There are no patents.”
  • Open Medicine Foundation
    • According to their mission, OMF supports “collaborative medical research to find effective treatments and diagnostic markers for chronic complex diseases with initial focus on ME/CFS.”

This year’s Open Access Week theme is “Open for Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge”. What does that mean?

Every year Open Access Week has a theme. Last year’s theme was “designing equitable foundations for open knowledge.” Nick Shockey, Director of Programs & Engagement at SPARC, explains this year’s theme “Open for Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge”; “As open becomes the default, all stakeholders must be intentional about designing these new, open systems to ensure that they are inclusive, equitable, and truly serve the needs of a diverse global community.”

Equity can play many roles in Open Access publishing. For example, it can refer to the accessibility of a platform hosting an Open Access journal, or the diversity of the editors, peer-reviewers, and authors of an Open Access journal. Open Access also brings equity to a field when all researchers have the same access to research and data. In contrast, accessing a traditional subscription journal requires a subscription which costs the institution, library, or individual money, if they can afford the journal.

How can I learn more about Open Access?

There are several resources available to learn more about Open Access. Here are a few:

If you have questions that were not answered above, please use the Strauss Library’s AskUs to chat or email with a librarian or reach out to Danielle Ostendorf (Danielle.2.Ostendorf@cuanschutz.edu), Electronic Resources Librarian.