Deadly Medicine Closing Event and Related Titles

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Have you seen the exhibit in the library’s main lobby, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race?  The exhibit is a partnership with the traveling exhibit from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum that is at the Fulginiti from March 20-May 22, 2018.  Visit the Fulginiti before the exhibit closes next week!

The closing event is on Tuesday evening at 6pm (Please RSVP):

Deadly Medicine Closing Event

Check out this list of related titles available at the library:

The Nazi Doctors and the Nuremberg Code: Human Rights in Human Experimentation by George J. Annas and Michael A. Grodin

Doctors From Hell: The Horrific Account of Nazi Experiments on Humans

Judy Chicago (in the Medical Humanities collection)

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Sunday’s Child?: A Memoir by Leslie Brent (in the Medical Humanities collection)

 

 

 

Amesse popular works:

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Night by Elie Wiesel (also in Medical Humanities)

 

 

 

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The Zookeeper’s Wife by Diane Acherman

 

 

 

Journals:

Holocaust and genocide studies (Online)

Holocaust and Genocide Studies, journal by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Holocaust Studies: A Journal of Culture and History

Ebooks:

The Holocaust as active memory the past in the present

 

 

The Holocaust as Active Memory: The Past in the Present edited by Marie Louise Seeberg, Irene Levina dn Claudia Lenz

 

 

 

Representing Auschwitz at the margins of testimony

 

 

Representing Auschwitz: At the Margins of Testimony edited by Nicholas Chare and Dominic Williams

 

 

 

The World Jewish Congress During the Holocaust: Between Activism and Restraint by Zohar Segev

Bringing the Dark Past to Light: The Reception of the Holocaust in Postcommunist Europe edited and with an introduction by John Paul Himka and Joanna Beata Michlic

Ethics, Art, and Representations of the Holocaust edited by Simone Gigliotti, Jacob Golomb and Caroline Steinberg Gould

The Holocaust in the East: Local Perpetrators and Soviet Responses edited by Michael David-Fox, Peter Holquist, Alexander M. Martin

Finland’s Holocaust: Silences of History edited by Simo Muir and Hana Worthen

Leaving Anschutz Medical Campus? Suggestions for a Smooth Transition

It’s that time of year! Students, residents, fellows, and faculty prepare to leave the Anschutz Medical Campus to advance their careers – an exciting, and occasionally overwhelming, prospect! After you have left the Anschutz Medical Campus, you will no longer have access to the Health Science Library’s resources, so here are some suggested steps and resources to help you transition.

Before You Go

PubMed: Change Your NCBI Email and Set Up Search Queries

Once you have officially left AMC and the University, you will no longer have access to your @ucdenver.edu email. To ensure NCBI account access–password resets and notifications are sent to your email stored in your NCBI profile–be sure to update your NCBI account with an email that you will still be able to access.

Many of you will continue to search MEDLINE via the freely-available PubMed interface. PubMed allows you to save searches and receive regular updates on current research in your field. To learn how to set up a My NCBI account to save searches in PubMed, visit the My NCBI web page. If you’d like a hand doing this, call us at (303) 724-2152 or fill out the AskUs contact form.

Ovid: Email Yourself Your Search Strategies

If you will have access to Ovid databases at your new institution, we suggest that you email yourself any saved searches before your Ovid account with the Health Sciences Library expires. You can then recreate your searches in your new Ovid account. We can help with this, too–call us at (303) 724-2152 or fill out the AskUs contact form.

At Your New Gig

Do you have an institutional library?

If you will be affiliated with a hospital, health system, or academic institution, you may have access to a library or information center. Check the institution’s website or contact colleagues to find out about library services. Reach out to the health sciences library staff at your new institution; they will be a valuable source of information about your new organization in addition to clinical and research information.

Are you near any local libraries, public and/or academic?

Visit the public library in your new location and ask about resources. Even libraries in small towns may offer access to major medical and science journals. Also, libraries at colleges and universities sometimes offer services to local communities, so if you will be located near a public college or university, explore the options they provide–usually, you must visit the physical library to use online resources. If you are still in the Denver area, you are welcome to use the Health Sciences Library by visiting the building.

A doctor looks at books in a library.

Personal Subscriptions/Membership Benefits

Subscribe to Point-of-care Tools

If your new institution does not provide access to clinical point-of-care resources, consider a personal subscription. Test drive the resources offered by the Health Sciences Library before you leave. Note that memberships in professional organizations may provide you with access to resources; for example, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), American College of Physicians (ACP), and American Medical Association (AMA) offer discounted or complimentary access to DynaMed. Current individual subscription prices for some of these products are provided below.

Take advantage of resources that are free or available with professional memberships

The benefits of membership in professional societies usually include access to the society’s publications or discounts on other resources. For example,  There are also many resources that are available for free – a selection of these is below.

  • BioMed Central: 300+ peer-reviewed open access health sciences journals.
  • bioRxiv: a free online archive and distribution service for unpublished preprints in the life sciences.
  • Directory of Open Access Journals: 10,000+ open access journals in all subjects including dentistry, medicine, nursing, and public health.
  • Disease Management Project: Online medical textbook from the Cleveland Clinic.
  • FreeBooks4Doctors:  360+ medical textbooks arranged by specialty.
  • Free Medical Journals: 4000+ medical/health journals.
  • HighWire Press Free Online Full-Text Articles: a massive archive of full-text articles on a variety of topics including medicine. Some are free, some require payment.
  • Medscape: Healthcare information from various medical publishers (registration is required).
  • Medscape Reference: Directory of information on more than 7,000 diseases and disorders; includes images and multimedia content.
  • Univadis: Medical news, online learning resources, and diagnostic tools (registration is required).
  • NCBI Bookshelf: A collection of online biomedical books from the National Library of Medicine.
  • PLoS Journals: Open access, peer-reviewed journals on a variety of topics published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS).
  • PMC (PubMed Central): A free full-text archive of nearly 4.8 million articles in the biomedical and life sciences journal literature at the National Library of Medicine.
  • RxList, The Internet Drug Index: An easy-to-search database of information about prescription medications. It includes a drug identification image database.

Resources for All

Sign Up for Loansome Doc

If you are joining an institution with a library, you should be able to request articles using their interlibrary loan program. However, if you are entering private practice or joining an organization without a library, consider opening a Loansome Doc account to obtain copies of journal articles (usually for a fee) from a hospital or academic medical library in your area. To find out about your options for document delivery and other support services, contact the National Network of Libraries of Medicine at 1-800-338-7657 or custserv@nlm.nih.gov.

Download Free/Inexpensive Apps

While many apps are linked to subscription-based products, there are some great inexpensive and free apps. The following are free unless noted:

The faculty and staff of the Health Sciences Library wish you the very best of luck as you move on to exciting new endeavors! If we can be of any assistance as you plan your departure, please call us at (303) 724-2152 or fill out the AskUs contact form.

By Scome-squ. [CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons]

A close-up photo of a surgeon's face as he operates.

By Phallinn Ooi. [CC BY 2.0 via Flickr]

Trial for Pharmacology World

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HSL just signed up for a trial of Pharmacology World. This is a new product offered by StatRef.  The trial will end on May 22, 2018.

Connect to Pharmacology World here.

Pharmacology World Introductory Video

Pharmacology World Handout

Pharmacology World videos key points:

  • Helps students master the key concepts of pharmacology
  • Covers all major drug classes and includes: mechanism of action, key pharmacokinetics, major therapeutic uses, and common and serious adverse effects
  • Incorporates relevant physiology, pathophysiology and biochemistry
  • Can be used to fill the void in lectures or in curriculums lacking pharmacology AND via the ‘flip classroom’ method so Instructors can ask students to view videos prior to their lecture to save time
  • Prepares students for course exams and national licensing exams

 

Please contact the Head of Collection Management Yumin Jiang with any feedback.

 

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Color Our Collection Coloring in the Lobby

Coloring book 2018_2-7

HSL’s rare materials librarian, Emily Epstein, has worked on making the Color Our Collections for 2018 into a coloring book.  She collected the coloring pages into a booklet, and Douglas set out the coloring books in the main lobby with coloring supplies, including crayons and colored pencils.

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Please stop by and color some of the coloring books!  This is a free stress relief activity during exams this May for our students.

You can also access the coloring book to download and print at home here.

The books are on the tables around the staircases in the main lobby.

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Jason, who you might recognize from the circulation desk, volunteered to get things started and color one of the coloring books!

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MyiLibrary Migration to Ebook Central Update

There were some technical issues for the last two weeks with the migration of the MyiLibrary titles to ProQuest Ebook Central.

After some technical work, the titles are re-directing correctly!

If you haven’t heard, MyiLibrary migrated to ProQuest Ebook Central on April 25, 2018.  Now when you access a MyiLibrary title in the HSL catalog, you will be redirected to this institution webpage:

MyiLibrary ProQuest Choose Institution2

Please choose University of Colorado Health Sciences Library.

MyiLibrary ProQuest Choose Institution

Here is a screen shot of the landing page:

MyiLibrary ProQuest Landing Page

You can access ProQuest Ebook Central here.  Please also let us know if you have any other issues.

The links from MyiLibrary will re-direct to ProQuest Ebook Central until the end of 2020. The HSL staff will work on cleaning up the links in Search HSL and the website in the meantime.  Please be patient with any cleanup!