Special Collections Featured Book for April

stitches
STITCHES a memoir…
By David Small
“One day David Small awoke from a supposedly harmless operation to discover that he had been transformed into a virtual mute. A vocal cord removed, his throat slashed and stitched together like a bloody boot, the fourteen-year-old boy had not been told that he had cancer and was expected to die.

In Stitches, Small, the award-winning children’s illustrator and author, re-creates this terrifying event in a life story that might have been imagined by Kafka. As the images painfully tumble out, one by one, we gain a ringside seat at a gothic family drama where David – a highly anxious yet supremely talented child – all too often became the unwitting object of his parents’ buried frustration and rage.

Believing that they were trying to do their best, David’s parents did just the reverse. Edward Small, a Detroit physician, who vented his own anger by hitting a punching bag, was convinced that he could cure his young son’s respiratory problems with heavy doses of radiation, possibly causing David’s cancer. Elizabeth, David’s mother, tyrannically stingy and excessively scolding, ran the Small household under a cone of silence where emotions, especially her own, were hidden.

Depicting this coming-of-age story with dazzling, kaleidoscopic images that turn nightmare into fairy tale, Small tells us of his journey from sickly child to cancer patient, to the troubled teen whose risky decision to run away from home at sixteen – with nothing more than the dream of becoming an artist – will resonate as the ultimate survival statement. …”

Medical Humanities/3rd floor Special Collections
QZ 201 S635s 2009

Upcoming Strauss-Wisneski Lecture on Integrative Medicine

Join us on Wednesday, May 13, 2015 from Noon – 1:00 pm for a new lecture in the Strauss-Wisneski Lecture series!  The speaker will be Dr. Lisa Corbin, Medical Director of Integrative Medicine at the University of Colorado Hospital (UCH) and Associate Professor, Internal Medicine, with the University of Colorado School of Medicine.  In her lecture, Dr. Corbin will give an update on the work of the UCH Center for Integrative Medicine.

The lecture will take place in the Health Sciences Library in Teaching Labs 1 and 2.  The lecture is open to the public and light refreshments will be served.

Hope you can join us!

Random from the Repository

Historic image: Rorschach Seminar at the University of Colorado Medical Center Campus. Group photograph taken during the Rorschach Seminar for Colorado Psychopathic Hospital staff, private psychiatrists, and Veterans Administration. 1946.

Repository image

Add your articles, lectures, reports, images, posters, presentation slides and more to Digital Collections of Colorado at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus!

Contact
heidi.zuniga@ucdenver.edu

Benefits:

  • Networking: Open the channels of communication in your field.
  • Visibility: Get online access to your own work and publications and that of your colleagues anytime, anywhere.
  • Open Access: Get unrestricted access to scholarly research and other resources in the repository.
  • Stability: Maintain your scholarly record with persistent urls in a platform designed to last.
  • Impact: Descriptive information about your deposited work will be indexed by Google and other search engines. Research suggests that open access to online articles may increase citation impact by 50-250%

Rare Book Profile: Dell’anatomia, a facsimile of Leonardo da Vinci’s notebook.

GE

Dell’anatomia by Leonardo da Vinci (Rome: TREC edizioni pregiate, 2005) is a compilation of anatomical studies that predate the great anatomy books of the sixteenth century.

In January 2015, the Health Sciences Library Rare Materials Collection acquired a facsimile of the anatomical drawings and notes of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), composed between 1485 and 1515, which are now housed in the Royal Library, Windsor.

Leonardo’s early training in the studio of the painter Verrocchio in Florence included study of the human figure. When he became court artist to Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan in the 1480s, he began work on drawings of human anatomy, but in the 1490s he turned his attention to other projects. As his stature as an artist, and inventor grew, so did his access to human corpses. In the early 1500s, he resumed intensive study of anatomy based on human dissection. His drawings were remarkably accurate, even by modern standards. Some of his observations, such as those on the function of the heart, were not recorded again until the 20th century. Had his work been published, as he seems to have intended, it would have been revolutionary.

At Leonardo’s death in 1519, his manuscripts and drawings were bequeathed to his student and secretary, Francesco Melzi. After Melzi died in 1579, the documents were dispersed, eventually making their way into various collections, where Leonardo’s scientific works remained unpublished until centuries after his death.

This edition, published in 2005, is based on earlier editions of 1898 and 1901. 1,999 copies were produced. The facsimile, containing 113 color plates with line drawing overlays and 380 pages of text, was printed on a special paper made in Verona, and hand-bound in gold-tooled leather. It was purchased with funds from the Charley Smyth Library Endowment, established with the Library by the Anschutz Medical Campus Retired Faculty Association, in memory of their colleague and friend Dr. Charley Smyth, founder and Head of the Division of Rheumatology in the Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

 

GE GE                           

 

 

Library Practicum Student: Teresa Wells

We are excited to have Teresa Wells, our newest intern from University of Denver’s Masters in Library & Information Science Program! We’re very grateful that Teresa has chosen the Health Sciences Library for her 100-hour practicum over Spring Quarter 2015.

Teresa’s project involves creating more visually-interesting Special Collections pages for the Health Sciences Library. The current special collections pages include the title and description of each collection. The library is interested in a more creative and visually-appealing display that includes images to highlight the various collections.

Teresa will be working with Vivienne Houghton, Web Services Librarian and Cathalina Fontenelle, Web Applications Developer. She will be using the Drupal content management system. Vivienne will be proctoring her project.

Teresa Wells’ Bio
Teresa-Wells
Teresa Wells is a Master’s of Library and Information Science Candidate for spring of 2015 at the University of Denver. She is passionate about the organization of information and wants to provide users on all levels ways to organize, access, and understand information in order to improve our communities. Her specific interest in information architecture is user experience design. Currently, Teresa manages the Morgridge College of Education website as the Web Administrator Assistant with Joshua Davies, Web Administrator. Through her current and future career in Information Science and volunteering, she hopes to help people spread their messages to create a more unified community empowered by knowledge. To read more about Teresa’s experience, visit her LinkedIn site.

Check back in May for Teresa’s future blog post about her experience.

Questions, please contact:
Vivienne Houghton, MLIS
Web Services Librarian | Instructor
Health Sciences Library
303-724-2178  |  vivienne.houghton@ucdenver.edu