New printing system arrives at the Health Sciences Library!

Graphic-Wireless Printing

We’re excited to reveal a new self-serve print system in the library. Users will be able to pay for print and copy jobs via credit card right at the printer locations.  Prices will remain the same, at .10/page for black and white and .25/page for color.

Wireless printing will also be available and better than ever. You’ll be able to send jobs to our library printers from anywhere and pick them up when it’s convenient for you!  Print jobs will remain available for up to 24 hours. There are multiple ways to print:

  • from workstations in the library,
  • from your own laptop (via wireless),
  • email files as an attachment, or
  • direct uploads to the PrintMe cloud.

Enjoy fast and easy print job retrieval at any of the print/copy release stations in the library. Simply scan the barcode for the job from your mobile device or key in in the document ID number. You can also print files directly from a USB drive or from cloud storage location. View a print and cost preview prior to printing, with the ability to change print options such as number of copies, pages to print, color printing, and more!

As part of this change, the library will be converting to a new card system for cash customers. The old copy cards issued by the library will be going away. As soon as possible, please use up any credit you have on old cards.  A new card dispensing machine will be located on first floor. This machine will accept cash only (no coins), and will replace all cash services at the library’s Service Desk.

Note: the older black and white student printer system that is used through accounts administered by the campus bookstore is still in place.

Questions? Comments?  Stop in at our Service Desk, or pick up the how-to handout at our printing locations.

Victorian Eyes

HisHerinkwells2RollOfTheTopic3

Now showing April thru June in the 3rd floor alcove of the Health Sciences Library

An Exhibition on Computational Approaches to Analyzing Victorian Novels
www.victorianeyes.com

His and Hers Inkwells: 1500
Art Piece (Carrie Roy): Brass, plastic 10” x 6” x 3”
Wells of inspiration, inspiring new applications for modern technology.
View complete lists for male and female authors and works analyzed online:
www.victorianeyes.com/His_Hers_Inkwells

Roll of the Topics: 5, 10, 20
Art Piece (Carrie Roy): Wood sculpture, black walnut, cherry, 26” x 15” x 13”
Dynamics of dice and numbers–one number sets new iterations in motion.
View results of the topic word clouds
website: www.victorianeyes.com/Roll_of_Topics

The Great Unread
Art Piece (Carrie Roy): Wood sculpture, black walnut, 14.5” x 17.25” x 2.5”
Study in absence and fragility through black walnut wood.
See: http://victorianeyes.com/Great_Unread

A collaborative Research/Exhibition project with funding from the New Arts Venture Challenge.
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Library Receives SIPA Grant

The Health Sciences Library was honored to receive a micro-grant from SIPA (State Internet Portal Authority) on March 29th, 2016. Digital Resources Librarian, Heidi Zuniga, who applied for the grant,  will use the money to purchase an overhead book scanner which is important for scanning fragile books and other items without damaging them. One of the first projects planned for the scanner will be the digitization of some of the works of Dr. Charles Denison on tuberculosis and high altitude medicine. The collection will be made available online in the library’s institutional repository, Digital Collections of Colorado. Check back on our blog for project news.

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Digital Resources Librarian, Heidi Zuniga, accepts a SIPA micro grant from Senator John Kefalas on March 29th, 2016.

What in the world is ORCiD?

If yorchids-nationalorchidgarden-20041025ou’re thinking that I merely misspelled the name these beautiful flowers,  you’d be mistaken.

ORCiD is a non-profit organization that provides unique identifiers for researchers.

This 16-digit identifier to any research output, such as publications, datasets, posters, basically anything. It’s basically a bar code that you can apply to your work to link you to your accomplishments.

ORCiD is currently being used worldwide. In fact, many publishers and international funding agencies require ORCiD iDs on funding applications and manuscript submissions.

Why are unique identifiers for researchers important?

A major challenge in cataloging research output for individuals and institutions is matching researchers to their output. Currently, the only way we have to distinguish researchers from one another are names and affiliations. This system is problematic for a number of reasons:

  • Names can change over the course of a career. This situation often occurs due to changes in marital status.
  • So do affiliations. Researchers almost certainly change their institution through their MD/PhD and postdoctoral training, but many also have other steps along the way.
  • Names are not unique. Many researchers, even within the same field, have the same or similar names, especially when databases only store first and middle initials.
  • Name formats are often not standardized. Researchers often publish under variations of the same names: some journals include first and middle names, some only accept first, not to mention typos.

To compound this problem, there is no one comprehensive source for all research publications. Thus, automated searches, such as the PubMed search strategy used with Colorado PROFILES, have issues with sensitivity and specificity. Faculty are asked to log in and curate their profiles, but many do not. A widely-used unique identifier for researchers that can travel with a researcher across institutions and can be integrated into many databases would solve this problem.

How does  orcid-logo fit in?

Because ORCiD is an independent non-profit organization, they provide an identifier that can be used for anything, anywhere. It stays with the researcher though name and affiliation changes. Even PubMed has an Author – Identifier field that uses ORCiD iDs now.

How is ORCiD different from other profile systems like ResearchGate and LinkedIn?

ORCiD isn’t meant to replace any of these systems. It’s not a professional networking platform like Research Gate and LinkedIn. ORCiD does provide an online profile system where researchers can display their accomplishments… or not. The ORCiD iD itself is useful even if you never fill out the profile system.  Additionally, these platforms do not provide a unique identifier. In fact, ResearchGate includes a field for ORCiD iD!

How is ORCiD different from other unique IDs for research output like Web of Science Researcher ID and Scopus Author ID?

Researcher ID and Author ID are, as indicated by their names, are unique IDs for researchers. However, their limitation is that they only link to citations within their respective databases (Web of Science and Scopus). Thus, they do not capture the whole picture. ORCiD iDs are platform agnostic and can import data from your Researcher and Author IDs, so you don’t have to start from scratch.

What about Google Scholar Citation Profile?

Google Scholar Citations is designed for you to keep track of your publications and associated citation metrics. ORCiD doesn’t do these things, but Google Scholar does not create a unique identifier.

But I already have all these things set up. Can I import things from these places?

Yes! Here are a list of tutorials:

ORCiD has not formed partnerships with ResearchGate and LinkedIn to allow direct transfer of information. ResearchGate does have a field where you can input your ORCiD iD.

How do I register for an ORCiD iD?

Individuals can get an ORCiD iD for free.

ORCiD has institutional partners that can automate this process for their faculty based on information they have on file. CU Anschutz has access to CU Boulder’s ORCiD membership. If you have questions or comments about the possibility of CU Anschutz using ORCiD, please contact tobin.magle@ucdenver.edu.

  • Tobin Magle, PhD. Bioinformationist.

 

 

Rare Book Profile: Arthur Hill Hassall’s Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine.

Arthur Hill Hassall’s Adulterations Detected, or, Plain Instructions for the Discovery of Frauds in Food and Medicine (London: Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, 1857) brought the problem of food and drug adulteration in London to public attention and led to major public health reforms.

Arthur Hill Hassall (1817-1894) was an English physician, microscopist, chemist, and pioneer in public health and food safety. He made major contributions in botany and histology, conducted some of the earliest research in what would become the field of phytopathology and wrote the first English text on histology. His research and activism improved the safety of the English food and water supply, and he was a pioneer in the sanatorium treatment of tuberculosis in Europe.

The youngest son of a physician in Middlesex, Hassall left home in 1834 to study at the Dublin Medical School and apprentice with his uncle, Sir James Murray, and became interested in microscopy and botany. In 1845, he moved to London, where he established a medical practice and continued his botanical studies. His research resulted in books on freshwater algae (1845) and the quality of London’s water supply (1850).

Hassall then turned to the problem of food quality. In 1850, he tested several samples of coffee, demonstrating that, contrary to popular belief, it was possible to detect adulteration microscopically and chemically. Publication of these results in The Lancet led to his becoming the chief analyst of the Analytical Sanitary Commission. From 1851 through 1854, Hassall analyzed over 2500 samples of food and drink from various London vendors. Chemical tests identified alum in bread, iron, lead, and mercury compounds in cayenne pepper, and copper salts in bottled foods. Vendors of both adulterated and pure products were named in the resulting reports, which were published in The Lancet. In 1855, Hassall published revised and expanded versions of his reports in a book, Food and Its Adulterations, followed two years later by a new work, Adulterations Detected. His work raised public awareness of how common adulteration was, which led to the Food Adulteration Act of 1860. In 1874 Hassall became the founding president of the Society of Public Analysts, and gained fame giving expert testimony in support of further reforms and legislation.

In addition to his investigative work, Hassall maintained a private medical practice in London. He was also elected to the staff of the Royal Free Hospital in 1853, where he served for fifteen years. In 1866, flare-up of pulmonary tuberculosis, which he had contracted as a student in Dublin, interrupted his career for several months while he sought treatment in different places, finally ending up in Ventnor, on the Isle of Wight. A Ventnor, he devised an innovative design for sanatorium living quarters, and the following year organized fundraising and construction of the facility. The Royal National Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Chest opened in Ventnor in 1868. In 1877 Hassall retired from his position as Chief Physician of the hospital and moved his family to San Remo, Italy, where he continued to treat patients and write on climatic treatment of tuberculosis until his death.

The Health Sciences Library’s copy of Adulterations Detected is the first edition. It was rebound in gray linen ca. 1970 by the Head of Denison Library, Frank B. Rogers, with a gilt-tooled black leather label from the original binding on the spine, and a former owner’s armorial bookplate affixed inside the front cover.

Rare materials are available to individuals or groups by appointment on Wednesday mornings and Thursday afternoons, or at other times by arrangement. To schedule an appointment, contact Emily Epstein, emily.epstein@ucdenver.edu or 303-724-2119.

[Emily Epstein, Cataloging Librarian]

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