FYI: 2015 Legislative Blue Book

The Blue Book provides voter information on ballot measures.The Colorado 2014 Legislative Blue Book is available in pdf and mp3 formats (courtesy of the Colorado Talking Book Library).

The purpose of the ballot information booklet is to provide voters with the text, title, and a fair and impartial analysis of each initiated or referred constitutional amendment, law, or question on the ballot. The analysis must include a summary of the measure, the major arguments both for and against the measure, and a brief fiscal assessment of the measure. The analysis may also include any other information that will help voters understand the purpose and effect of a measure.

Article V, Section 1 (7.5), Colorado Constitution, and Section 1-40-124.5, Colorado Revised Statutes, require the Legislative Council Staff to prepare the ballot information booklet prior to each election in which a statewide issue will appear on the ballot.

Need to register to vote?  If you wish to receive a mail-in ballot register as soon as possible!

If you need information about voting in local elections contact your city or county clerk.

Happy voting!


[Amanda Langdon]

Exciting News for Anschutz Medical Campus Faculty and Staff! FREE INTERLIBRARY LOAN (ILL)!


Beginning July 1, 2015, most CU-Anschutz Medical Campus Faculty and Staff will now receive FREE INTERLIBRAYRY LOAN (ILL)! This includes paid University faculty and staff of CU Anschutz, faculty paid by affiliates, volunteer clinical/faculty, retired CU Anschutz faculty, CU Anschutz fellows, CU Anschutz visiting scholars and students, and UPI employees. CU Anschutz students and residents will continue to receive no-cost ILL as well.

Some affiliated users will still be charged services fees ($8/filled request, $18/rush). This includes CU Anschutz alumni who live in Colorado, CU Anschutz volunteer staff, UCH paid staff, UCH volunteers, other CU faculty, staff, and students, CCML members, and residents paid by other health organizations.

There will be no changes in current fees for all other users ($18/filled request, $48/rush). This includes Colorado public, non-university fellows, non-university visiting scholars, and all others not listed above.

Please be advised that this is a 2-year pilot program, 2015-2017.

Sign up for an ILLiad account today!

If you have any questions about your affiliation and eligibility, please contact the ILL office at 303-724-2111 or with any and all questions.

[Brittany Heer, Library Technician II, Interlibrary Loan]

Clinical Corner: IOM’s “Improving Diagnosis in Health Care”

Clinical Corner

On September 22, 2015, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a new report titled “Improving Diagnosis in Health Care.” This continues the series of reports that began in 1999, the first being “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System.”

The National Academies Press is currently offering a prepublication print copy for sale, or you can pre-order a paperback. But there are also several free options: you can read it online in HTML format, or download a copy in PDF format. To download a PDF you can either create a free MyNAP account or download it as a guest.


  • A new page will open. From there, select either Download Free PDF or Read Online (on the right-hand side of the page).


Kristen DeSanto, MSLS, MS, RD, AHIP

Clinical Librarian • 303-724-2121

Bioinformatics Bites: Repurposing publicly available data

I’m going in a bit of a different direction with this bioinformatics bite segment. Instead of explicitly describing how to use a database or tool, I wanted to tell you all about a little project that I’m working on with a vet student from CSU.

Just because I don’t have a lab or large amounts of research funding doesn’t mean I can’t do science! There’s a wealth of bioinformatic data publicly available online and some user friendly tools that are available. We’re using these freely available resources to ask questions about how the distribution of microbes in the environment correlates with specific landmarks.

Our research question is as follows: Are there differences in microbial populations at sites that are close to zoos in the NYC area compared to the farther away. To address this question, we are using data from the PathoMap project, which swabbed surfaces in transit stops all over New York City. (This project is also being expanded to the top 10 cities worldwide for public transit ridership by a project called MetaSub.) See this publication for more information.

pathomap Pathomap main page

We determined test and control sites by looking up how city planners determine the distance people are willing to walk to a transit stop. We are also using a tool called GeneGis 2 to analyze and visualize these data. See this publication for more information on GenGIS.

gengisGenGIS output from their wiki

Repurposing data forces you to think differently. Our research question was designed in the context of what data and tools were publicly available. This type of research will only get easier as the mindset of creating well-designed community resources expands. Initiatives like Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) and the Center for Open Science are driving this new trend.

If you’re curious about data repurposing, or how to find datasets and tools, please see the bioinformatics section of our new Research Support Pages or set up a consultation to discuss your questions.

  • Tobin Magle, biomedical sciences research support specialist.

Clinical Corner: Acute Care for Older Adults

Clinical Corner

Today’s Department of Medicine Grand Rounds featured an informative and entertaining presentation by Dr. Samir Sinha, from Toronto’s Mount Sinai and University Health Network Hospitals. Dr. Sinha, whose presentation was titled “Rethinking Traditional Models of Acute Care for Older Adults,” discussed how current healthcare delivery in Canada and the United States can negatively impact older adults. He presented the Acute Care for Elders (ACE) Strategy, employed at his hospital, as an alternative.

The following articles and resources, many of which were discussed by Dr. Sinha, are related to the topic of patient and system outcomes for older adults:

Continue reading

Bioinformatics Bites: PubChem Bioassay

The NCBI insights blog has another wonderful post about PubChem.

This week, the post focuses on using the Bioassay database and how it can help identify chemical reagents and drugs.

  • Tobin Magle, PhD, Biomedical Sciences Research Support Specialist